0
RESEARCH PAPERS: Offshore Mechanics/Ocean Engineering

Damage Detection in Offshore Structures by the Random Decrement Technique

[+] Author and Article Information
J. C. S. Yang, J. Chen

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 20742

N. G. Dagalakis

National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, Md.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 106(1), 38-42 (Mar 01, 1984) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3231021 History: Received November 12, 1982; Revised October 28, 1983; Online October 22, 2009

Abstract

The Random Decrement Technique has shown promise as an inspection technique for offshore structures. The major advantage of this technique is that it requires only measurements of the dynamic response of the structure and not the input excitation causing the response. On offshore platforms, such random input forces occur from wind, waves, and currents. The Random Decrement Technique was evaluated together with a number of other NDE techniques under the NDE round robin testing program sponsored by the United States Geological Survey and the Office of Naval Research. A series of tests, damage scenarios, were conducted on a model of an offshore structure in a blind-mode by an independent neutral agent. Test data were given to the corresponding advocates to be analyzed and interpreted to predict the damages. Initial results indicated that the Random Decrement Technique was able to identify all the damage and non-damage situations with the usage of only four accelerometers mounted on each of the legs of the structure.

Copyright © 1984 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In