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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Local Furnace Data and Modeling Comparison for a 600-MWe Coal-Fired Utility Boiler

[+] Author and Article Information
Yuh-Long Hwang

Dynegy Marketing and Trade, Houston, TXe-mail: yuh-long.hwang@dynegy.com

John R. Howell

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712e-mail: jhowell@mail.utexas.edu

J. Energy Resour. Technol 124(1), 56-66 (Mar 25, 2002) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1447543 History: Received January 05, 2000; Revised June 27, 2001; Online March 25, 2002
Copyright © 2002 by ASME
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References

Robinson,  G. F., 1985, “A Three-Dimensional Analytical Model of A Large Tangential-Fired Furnace,” J. Inst. Energy, 58, pp. 116–150.
Boyd, R. K., and Kent, J. H., 1986, “Three-Dimensional Furnace Computer Modeling,” Twenty-first Symposium (Int.) on Combustion, The Combustion Inst., Pittsburgh, PA, p. 265.
Abbas, A. S., and Lockwood, F. C., 1986, “Prediction of Power Station Combustors,” Twenty-First Symposium (Int.) on Combustion, The Combustion Inst., Pittsburgh, PA, pp. 285–292.
Gillis, A., and Smith, P. J., 1990, “An Evaluation of Three-Dimensional Computational Combustion and Fluid-Dynamics for Industrial Furnace Geometries,” Twenty-Third Symposium (Int.) on Combustion, The Combustion Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, pp. 981–991.
Adams, B. R., and Smith, P. J., 1992, “Three-Dimensional Discrete-Ordinates Modeling of Radiative Transfer in Industrial-Scale Furnaces,” ASME HTD-Vol. 203, Developments in Radiative Heat Transfer.
Adams, B. R., and Smith, P. J., 1994, “Modeling Effects of Soot and Turbulence-Radiation Coupling on Radiative Transfer in an Industrial Furnace,” ASME HTD-Vol. 276, Developments in Radiative Heat Transfer.
Butler, B. W., and Webb, B. W., 1990, “Measurement of Local Temperature and Heat Flux in an Industrial Coal-Fired Boiler,” ASME HTD-Vol. 142, pp. 49–56.
Hill,  S. C., and Smoot,  L. D., 1993, “A Comprehensive Three-Dimensional Model for Simulation of Combustion Systems: PCGC-3,” Energy Fuels, 7, No. 6. pp. 874–883.
Advanced Combustion Engineering Research Center, 1993, “93-PCGC-3 Pulverized Coal Gasification or Combustion 3-Dimensional USER MANUAL,” Brigham Young University, Provo, UT.
Carter, H. R., 1992, “Furnace Cleaning in Utility Boilers Burning Powder River Basin Coals,” Western Fuels Conference, Aug.
International Flame Research Foundation, 1996, “Research Report and Manual on IFRF Combustion Instruments/Equipment,” Velsen-Noord, The Netherlands.
Combustion Engineering, 1979, “C-E Instructional Manual for the LCRA FPP unit 2.”
Hwang, Y.-L., 1997, Three-Dimensional Model Studies of a Pulverized Coal Corner-Fired Utility Furnace and Comparisons with Local Furnace Data and Boiler ExhaustNOx, Ph.D. dissertation, Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, Aug.
Hough, D. C., 1988, “ASME Ash Fusion Research Project,” Babcock Energy Fuel Consultancy, London, England, Report No. FT/88/01, Contract No. 8133.

Figures

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Gas temperature profiles at FL 8.6, 9, and 10 for burner elevations 2–6
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Gas temperature profiles at FL 8.6, 9, and 10 for burner elevations 1–5
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Gas temperature profiles at FL 8.6, 9, and 10 for burner elevations 1 and 4–6
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Heat flux to the furnace water wall for different burner configurations
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Stack NOx emissions (dry) for different burner elevations
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Gas temperature profile comparisons for 3.5 percent excess O2 (Test 13A) and 2.5 percent excess O2 (Test 13B); burner elevations 1–5
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Stack NOx emissions (dry) for 3.5 percent excess O2 and 2.5 percent excess O2; burner elevations 1–5
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Gas temperature profiles for burner tilt angles between 0 (Test 10D) and −20 deg (Test 10A); burner elevations 1–5
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Stack NOx emissions (dry) for various overfire air damper settings; burner elevations 2–6
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Windbox, nozzles, and firing circle of burners
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Temperature comparisons between measurements and predictions at FL 10; burner elevations 1–5
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Temperature comparisons between measurement and prediction at FL 9; burner elevations 1–5
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Temperature comparisons between measurements and predictions at FL 8.6; burner elevations 1–5
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Temperature comparisons between measurements and predictions at FL 7, 8, and 8.3; burner elevations 1–5
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Temperature comparisons between measurements and predictions at FL 6; burner elevations 1–5
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Temperature comparisons between measurements and predictions at FL 4; burner elevations 1–5
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Wall irradiation comparisons between measurements and predictions for burner elevations 1–5 and 2–6
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Wall irradiation comparisons among models for burner elevations L-4, 1–5, and 2–6; wall emissivities of ε=0.38 and 0.6
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Gas temperature contours (K) for models for burner elevations L-4 and 2–6 at midplane between north and south walls; wall emissivity ε=0.38
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Flow velocity vectors for burner elevations L-4 and 2–6 models at the midplane between the north and south walls; ε=0.38
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Averaged furnace gas temperatures among models for burner elevations L-4, 1–5, and 2–6; wall emissivities of ε=0.38 and 0.6

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