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RESEARCH PAPERS

Dynamic Performance Analysis of a Compressor Driven Metal Hydride Cooling System

[+] Author and Article Information
Sagnik Mazumdar

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, India 721302

M. Ram Gopal

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, India 721302

Souvik Bhattacharyya1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, India 721302

1

Corresponding author. Tel.: 91-3222-282904, Fax: 91-3222-255303, E-mail: souvik@mech.iitkgp.ernet.in

J. Energy Resour. Technol 128(1), 35-43 (Apr 15, 2005) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2126983 History: Received March 23, 2004; Revised April 15, 2005

Though several studies have been reported to show that compressor driven metal hydride cooling systems are competitive with conventional vapor compression systems, an elaborate computational model that takes into account the transient nature of the compressor and the conditioned space is still unreported. The results presented here are obtained for a room air conditioner with Zr0.9Ti0.1Cr0.55Fe1.45 as the hydrogen absorbing material and employing standard heat exchanger configurations. Though previous thermodynamic and transient studies predicted attainment of significant coefficients of performance, the present results indicate that even with the optimal design the maximum coefficient of performance and specific power will be around 2.38 and 750kJkg-alloy.h, respectively. This indicates a need for better materials and effective control strategies so that these systems can become commercially viable.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of the metal hydride cooling system

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Figure 2

Variation of room temperature with effective thermal conductivity

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Figure 3

Variation of room temperature with different ACR tubes

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Figure 4

Variation of reactor length, mass of metal hydride per reactor, and total mass required for pull down with different ACR tubes

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Figure 5

Variation of reactor length, mass of metal hydride per reactor, and total mass required for pull down with effective thermal conductivity

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Figure 6

Variation of room temperature with external heat transfer coefficient

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Figure 7

Average specific power, average COP, and stable cycle COP as a function of cycle time

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Figure 8

(a) Variation of reactor wall temperatures and room temperature with time under optimum specific power conditions. (b) Variation of reactor pressures with time under optimum specific power conditions.

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Figure 9

(a) Variation of H2 concentration (X) in the reactor beds with time. (b) Variation of bed temperatures in the reactors with time.

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Figure 10

(a) Variation of compressor work and cooling power with time. (b) Variation of P-V cycle with time in the half cycle from 57.5 to 60min.

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Figure 11

(a) Variation of cycle COP and average COP with time. (b) Variation of cycle specific power and average specific power with time.

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