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RESEARCH PAPERS

Assessment of Sorbent Reactivation by Water Hydration for Fluidized Bed Combustion Application

[+] Author and Article Information
Fabio Montagnaro1

Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario del Monte di Sant’Angelo, 80126 Napoli, Italyfabio.montagnaro@unina.it

Piero Salatino

Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale Vincenzo Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli, Italy

Fabrizio Scala

 Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione, CNR, Piazzale Vincenzo Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli, Italy

Yinghai Wu, Edward J. Anthony, Lufei Jia

CETC-O, Natural Resources Canada, 1 Haanel Drive, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 1M1

1

Corresponding author.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 128(2), 90-98 (May 30, 2005) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2134734 History: Received June 11, 2004; Revised May 30, 2005

Disposal of fluidized bed combustion (FBC) solid residues currently represents one of the major issues in FBC design and operation, and contributes significantly to its operating cost. This issue has triggered research activities on the enhancement of sorbent utilization for in situ sulfur removal. The present study addresses the effectiveness of the reactivation by liquid water hydration of FB spent sorbents. Two materials are considered in the study, namely the bottom ash from the operation of a full-scale utility FB boiler and the raw commercial limestone used in the same boiler. Hydration-reactivation tests were carried out at temperatures of 40°C and 80°C and for curing times ranging from 15minutes to 2d, depending on the sample. The influence of hydration conditions on the enhancement of sulfur utilization has been assessed. A combination of methods has been used to characterize the properties of liquid water-hydrated materials.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

XRD spectra of (a ) 0.3–0.6mm as-received bottom ash; (b ) and (c ) 0.3–0.6mm ash samples hydrated at 40°C for 1 and 2days, respectively. (A=anhydrite ASTM 37-1496, CaSO4; Alu=alumina ASTM 26-31, Al2O3; G=gibbsite ASTM 33-18, Al(OH)3; L=lime ASTM 4-0777, CaO; P=portlandite ASTM 4-0733, Ca(OH)2; SS=calcium sulfosilicate ASTM 26-1071, 4CaO∙2SiO2∙CaSO4.)

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Figure 2

SEM micrographs (upper row) and EDX sulphur maps (lower row) of cross sections of (a ) a multiparticle 0.3–0.6mm as-received bottom ash sample; (b ) and (c ) multiparticle 0.3–0.6mm ash samples hydrated at 40°C for 1 and 2days, respectively

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Figure 3

Schematic diagram of CETC mini-CFBC

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Figure 4

Degree of calcium conversion of 0.3–0.6mm as-received bottom ash as a function of time during sulfation test

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Figure 5

Degree of calcium conversion as a function of time during the resulfation tests of 0.3–0.6mm ash samples hydrated at 40°C for 1 and 2days

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Figure 6

Initial free lime and Ca(OH)2 contents before hydration, determined by the sucrose method

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Figure 7

Free CaO content after hydration of partly sulfated samples

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Figure 8

Ca(OH)2 content after hydration of partly sulfated samples

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Figure 9

Apparent conversion of CaO to Ca(OH)2

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