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RESEARCH PAPERS

Implementation of 3-Port Condensing Wave Rotors in R718 Cycles

[+] Author and Article Information
Amir A. Kharazi

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Michigan State University, Engineering Building, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1226amir.kharazia@jacobs.com

Pezhman Akbari

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Michigan State University, Engineering Building, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1226amir.kharazia@jacobs.com

Norbert Müller

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Michigan State University, Engineering Building, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1226amir.kharazia@jacobs.com

J. Energy Resour. Technol 128(4), 325-334 (Sep 28, 2005) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2131886 History: Received April 02, 2004; Revised September 28, 2005

The use of a novel 3-port condensing wave rotor is suggested to enhance the turbocompression in a refrigeration cycle that works only with water (R718) as a refrigerant. Although the implementation of such a wave rotor essentially reduces the size and cost of R718 units, their efficiency may also be increased. The condensing wave rotor employs pressurized water to pressurize, desuperheat, and condense the refrigerant vapor, all in one dynamic process. The underlying phenomena of flash evaporation, shock wave compression, desuperheating, and condensation inside the wave rotor channels are described in a wave and phase-change diagram. The thermodynamic process is shown in pressure-enthalpy and temperature-entropy diagrams. Based on the described thermodynamic model, a computer program was generated to evaluate the performance of R718 baseline and wave-rotor-enhanced cycles. The effect of some key parameters on the performance enhancement is demonstrated as an aid for optimization. A performance map summarizes the findings. It shows optimum wave rotor pressure ratio and maximum relative performance improvement of R718 cycles by using the 3-port condensing wave rotor.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of a R718 chiller unit with direct condensation and evaporation

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Figure 2

Schematic of thermodynamic model of a R718 chiller unit with a two-stage compressor and a direct condenser

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Figure 3

Size reduction by combining intercooler, second-stage compression, and condensation into a condensing wave rotor (CWR)

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Figure 4

Schematic of the thermodynamic model of a R718 chiller unit enhanced by a 3-port condensing wave rotor (CWR) substituting for the condenser and for one stage of compressor

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Figure 5

Schematic of a 3-port condensing wave rotor

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Figure 6

(a) Schematic wave and phase-change diagram for the 3-port condensing wave rotor (high pressure part) and (b) A magnified channel showing the regions modeled during compression and condensation

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Figure 7

Schematic p‐h diagram of a R718 baseline cycle and enhanced cycle with a 3-port condensing wave rotor

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Figure 8

Schematic T‐s diagram of a R718 baseline cycle and enhanced cycle with a 3-port condensing wave rotor

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Figure 9

Novel compact R718 water chiller with integration of a condensing wave rotor

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Figure 10

Relative COP increase versus evaporation temperature for different mass flow ratios

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Figure 11

Relative COP increase versus mass flow ratio for different evaporation temperatures

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Figure 12

Relative COP increase versus the wave rotor pressure ratio for different mass flow ratios

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Figure 13

Heat rejecter temperature versus evaporator temperature for different wave rotor pressure ratios

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Figure 14

Performance map: maximum performance increase and optimum wave rotor pressure ratios

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