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RESEARCH PAPERS

The Exhaust Heat Use Plan When Connecting Solar Modules to a Fuel Cell Energy Network

[+] Author and Article Information
Shin’ya Obara

 Ichinoseki National College of Technology, Takanashi, Hagisho, Ichinoseki 021-8511, Japanobara@indigo.plala.or.jp

J. Energy Resour. Technol 129(1), 18-28 (Jan 26, 2006) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2424962 History: Received August 16, 2005; Revised January 26, 2006

The energy supply method by distributed power supply is expected from the transportation loss of the power and a decrease in heat. The system using especially renewable energy and a fuel cell is excellent from the viewpoint of the environment. However, the efficiency of the whole system depends on the amount of utilization of exhaust heat. The system assumed in this paper installs a small fuel cell and a solar module in 12 buildings, connects each building with hot-water piping, and supplies fuel cell exhaust heat. The hot-water piping path that results in minimum heat release loss was investigated in the optimization analysis using a genetic algorithm. As a result, the optimal path of the hot-water piping considering the production of electricity of a solar module and ambient temperature was clarified.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Fuel cell network model (FEN) installed in an urban area. Minimum length of the hot-water piping is 517m.

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Figure 2

Energy demand patterns

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Figure 3

Outside temperature model in Sapporo

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Figure 4

Solar module output model

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Figure 5

Hot-water piping network of FEN with solar modules

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Figure 6

FEN system equipment

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Figure 7

The allocation relationship between distributed fuel cells and heat release

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Figure 8

Hot-water piping model

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Figure 9

Fuel cell stack performance

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Figure 10

Analysis flow of the genetic algorithm

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Figure 11

Results of the optimization analysis of a hot-water piping path without a solar module

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Figure 12

Results of the optimization analysis of a hot-water piping path with a solar module. The energy demand pattern of all the buildings is based on a two person family household (TH).

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Figure 13

Heat energy demand and heat release volume. The energy demand pattern of all the buildings is two person family household (TH).

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Figure 14

Results of the optimization analysis of a hot-water piping path. The energy demand pattern of all the buildings excluding S5 is the buildings is two person family household (TH). The energy demand pattern of S5 is the office (SO).

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Figure 15

Heat energy demand and heat release volume. The energy demand pattern of all buildings excluding S5 are those with two person family households (TH). The energy demand pattern of S5 is the office (SO).

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Figure 16

Results of the optimization analysis of a hot-water piping path. The building arrangement is the pattern shown in Fig. 1.

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Figure 17

Results of the optimization analysis of a hot-water piping path with a solar module. The building arrangement is the pattern shown in Fig. 1.

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Figure 18

Rate of heat release volume. The building arrangement is the pattern shown in Fig. 1.

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