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RESEARCH PAPERS

Performance Evaluation of a Gas Turbine Operating Noncontinuously with its Inlet Air Cooled Through an Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage

[+] Author and Article Information
Farhad Behafarid

School of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Azadi Blvd, Tehran, Iranbehafarid2002@yahoo.com

Mehdi N. Bahadori1

School of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Azadi Blvd, Tehran, Iranmbahadori@ias.ac.ir

1

Corresponding author.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 129(2), 117-124 (Dec 10, 2006) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2719203 History: Received April 13, 2006; Revised December 10, 2006

The power output of gas turbines (GT) reduces greatly with the increase of the inlet air temperature. This is a serious problem because gas turbines have been used traditionally to provide electricity during the peak power demands, and the peak power demands in many areas occur on summer afternoons. An aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) was employed for cooling of the inlet air of the GT. Water from a confined aquifer was cooled in winter and was injected back into the aquifer. The stored chilled water was withdrawn in summer to cool the GT inlet air. The heated water was then injected back into the aquifer. A 20MW GT power plant with 6 and 12h of operation per day, along with a two-well aquifer, was considered for analysis. The purpose of this investigation was to estimate the GT performance improvement. The conventional inlet air cooling methods such as evaporative cooling, fogging and absorption refrigeration were studied and compared with the ATES system. It was shown that for 6h of operation per day, the power output and efficiency of the GT on the warmest day of the year could be increased from 16.5 to 19.7MW and from 31.8% to 34.2%, respectively. The performance of the ATES system was the best among the cooling methods considered on the warmest day of the year. The use of ATES is a viable option for the increase of gas turbines power output and efficiency, provided that suitable confined aquifers are available at their sites. Air cooling in ATES is not dependent on the wet-bulb temperature and therefore can be used in humid areas. This system can also be used in combined cycle power plants.

Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 10

The GT efficiency during the warmest day of the year (6h of operation per day)

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Figure 11

Efficiency improvement of GT

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Figure 12

Temperature distribution in aquifer at the end of summer and winter (12h of operation per day)

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Figure 13

Temperature distribution in aquifer at the end of summer and winter (6h of operation per day)

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Figure 14

Percentage of improvement of the power output of GT with different cooling methods (12h of operation per day)

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Figure 15

Percentage of improvement of the power output of GT with different cooling methods (6h of operation per day)

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Figure 16

Initial costs of different compressor inlet air cooling methods

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Figure 9

The GT efficiency during the warmest day of the year (12h of operation per day)

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Figure 8

Number of hours per day that chilled water is injected into the aquifer when GT is not operating

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Figure 7

Net power output of GT during the warmest day of the year (6h of operation per day)

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Figure 6

Net power output of GT during the warmest day of the year (12h of operation per day)

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Figure 5

Net power output of GT with and without the use of ATES (6h of operation per day)

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Figure 4

Net power output of GT with and without the use of ATES (12h of operation per day)

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Figure 3

Number of hours per day that chilled water is withdrawn from the aquifer

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Figure 2

Number of hours per day that chilled water is injected into the aquifer

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Figure 1

The ATES system employed

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