0
RESEARCH PAPERS

Thermal System Interactions in Optimizing Advanced Thermoelectric Energy Recovery Systems

[+] Author and Article Information
Terry J. Hendricks1

Energy Science & Technology Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, WA 99352

1

Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Battelle Memorial Institute under Contract No. DE-AC05-76RL01830.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 129(3), 223-231 (Oct 26, 2006) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2751504 History: Received December 20, 2005; Revised October 26, 2006

Energy recovery is gaining importance in various transportation and industrial process applications because of rising energy costs and geopolitical uncertainties impacting basic energy supplies. Various advanced thermoelectric (TE) materials have properties that are inherently advantageous for particular TE energy recovery applications. Skutterudites, zero- and one-dimensional quantum-well materials, and thin-film superlattice materials are providing enhanced opportunities for advanced TE energy recovery in transportation and industrial processes. This work demonstrates (1) the potential for advanced thermoelectric systems in vehicle energy recovery and (2) the inherently complex interaction between thermal system performance and thermoelectric device optimization in energy recovery. Potential power generation at specific exhaust temperature levels and for various heat exchanger performance levels is presented showing the current design sensitivities using different TE material sets. Mathematical relationships inherently linking optimum TE design variables and the thermal systems design (i.e., heat exchangers and required mass flow rates) are also investigated and characterized.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

TE/heat exchanger system schematic

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Power and cold-side mass flow dependency on TE hot- and cold-side temperature conditions (TE material set No. 1). V=42V, UAh=100W∕K, Tex=840K, and Tamb=300K

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Maximum TE efficiency—power map for TE material set No. 1. V=42V, UAh=100W∕K, Tex=840K, and Tamb=300K.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Maximum TE efficiency—power map for TE material set No. 1. V=42V, UAh=600W∕K, Tex=840K, and Tamb=300K.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Peak power versus ṁc versus UAh map for TE material set No. 1. UAh=100,250,400,600W∕K.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Power dependency on TE hot- and cold-side temperature conditions (TE material set No. 2). V=42V, UAh=100W∕K.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Maximum TE efficiency—Power map for TE material set No. 2. V=42V, UAh=100W∕K, Tex=973K, and Tamb=300K.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Peak power versus ṁc and UAh map for TE material set No. 2. UAh=100,250,400,600W∕K.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Optimum peak power thermoelectric design dependence on hot-side thermal design—TE material set No. 1

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Optimum peak power p-type thermoelectric design dependence on hot-side thermal design parameters—TE material set No. 2

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Optimum peak power n-type thermoelectric design dependence on hot-side thermal design parameters—TE material set No. 2

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Optimum peak power per cold-side mass flow rate for varying hot-side thermal design parameters—TE material set No. 1

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In