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Research Papers: Hydrates/Coal Bed Methane/Heavy Oil/Oil Sands/Tight Gas

Numerical Studies of Gas Hydrate Formation and Decomposition in a Geological Reservoir

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Uddin

 Alberta Research Council Inc., 250 Karl Clark Road, Edmonton, AB, T6N 1E4, Canadauddin@arc.ab.ca

D. Coombe

 Computer Modeling Group Ltd., 3512-33 Street Northwest, Calgary, AB, T2L 2A6, Canadadennis.coombe@cmgl.ca

D. Law

 Schlumberger Reservoir Fluids Center, 9450-17 Avenue, Edmonton, AB, T6N 1M9, Canadadlaw@slb.com

B. Gunter

 Alberta Research Council Inc., 250 Karl Clark Road, Edmonton, AB, T6N 1E4, Canadabill.gunter@arc.ab.ca

J. Energy Resour. Technol 130(3), 032501 (Aug 08, 2008) (14 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2956978 History: Received August 27, 2007; Revised March 28, 2008; Published August 08, 2008

Numerical modeling of gas hydrates can provide an integrated understanding of the various process mechanisms controlling methane (CH4) production from hydrates and carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration as a gas hydrate in geologic reservoirs. This work describes a new unified kinetic model which, when coupled with a compositional thermal reservoir simulator, can simulate the dynamics of CH4 and CO2 hydrate formation and decomposition in a geological formation. The kinetic model contains two mass transfer equations: one equation converts gas and water into hydrate and the other equation decomposes hydrate into gas and water. The model structure and parameters were investigated in comparison with a previously published model. The proposed kinetic model was evaluated in two case studies. Case 1 considers a single well within a natural hydrate reservoir for studying the kinetics of CH4 and CO2 hydrate decomposition and formation. A close agreement was achieved between the present numerical simulations and results reported by Hong and Pooladi-Darvish (2003, “A Numerical Study on Gas Production From Formations Containing Gas Hydrates  ,” Petroleum Society’s Canadian International Petroleum Conference, Calgary, AB, Jun. 10–12, Paper No. 2003-060). Case 2 considers multiple wells within a natural hydrate reservoir for studying the unified kinetic model to demonstrate the feasibility of CO2 sequestration in a natural hydrate reservoir with potential enhancement of CH4 recovery. The model will be applied in future field-scale simulations to predict the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and decomposition processes in actual geological reservoirs.

Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

K-value (K=pLw-H-V∕p) curves for the CH4 and CO2 hydrate stability (K=1 corresponds to three-phase equilibrium, K>1 to hydrate decomposition, and K<1 to hydrate formation)

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Figure 2

CH4 production—effect of reaction rate constants (λd in (gmole∕m3)−1∕kPaday) in CH4 hydrate decomposition. Operating well bottom hole pressure of 4300kPa.

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Figure 3

CO2 production—effect of reaction rate constants (λd in (gmole∕m3)−1∕kPaday) in CO2 hydrate decomposition. Operating well bottom hole pressure of 3000kPa.

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Figure 4

CH4 production—effect of rock thermal conductivity in CH4 hydrate decomposition (line, present model; marker, Hong and Pooladi-Darvish (1))

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Figure 5

CH4 production—effect of reservoir permeability in CH4 hydrate decomposition (line, present model; marker, Hong and Pooladi-Darvish (13))

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Figure 6

CO2 production—effect of reservoir permeability in CO2 hydrate decomposition

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Figure 7

Pressure and temperature variations—effect of reservoir permeability in CH4 hydrate decomposition

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Figure 8

Pressure and temperature variations—effect of reservoir permeability in CO2 hydrate decomposition

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Figure 9

CH4 hydrate concentrations at time t=10years—effect of reservoir permeability in decomposition; initial conditions: pi=6913kPa, Ti=10°C, operating well bottom hole pressure of 4300kPa.

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Figure 10

CO2 hydrate concentrations at time t=10years—effect of reservoir permeability in decomposition; initial conditions: pi=4500kPa, Ti=10°C, operating well bottom hole pressure of 3000kPa

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Figure 11

The average field variations of CH4 hydrate, pressure, and temperature—effect of gas injection rates (q) in CH4 hydrate formation (unit of q in m3∕day)

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Figure 12

The average field variations of CO2 hydrate, pressure, and temperature—effect of gas injection rates (q) in CO2 hydrate formation (unit of q in m3∕day)

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Figure 13

The average field variations of CH4 hydrate, pressure, and temperature—effect of reservoir permeability in CH4 hydrate formation

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Figure 14

The average field variations of CO2 hydrate, pressure, and temperature—effect of reservoir permeability in CO2 hydrate formation

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Figure 15

CH4 hydrate concentrations at time t=2years—effect of reservoir permeability in hydrate formation; initial conditions: pi=4500kPa, Ti=6°C, gas injection rate of 4×103m3∕day (STD)

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Figure 16

CO2 hydrate concentrations at time t=2years—effect of reservoir permeability in hydrate formation; initial conditions: pi=3000kPa, Ti=6°C, gas injection rate of 4×103m3∕day (STD)

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Figure 17

The variations of CH4 hydrate, CH4 gas production, CO2 hydrate concentration, and CO2 gas injection (solid line, CH4 gas production; dotted line, CO2 sequestration)

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Figure 18

The average field pressure and temperature—CH4 gas production and CO2 sequestration in gas hydrate reservoir

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Figure 19

CH4 hydrate distributions—CH4 gas production and CO2 sequestration in gas hydrate reservoir

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Figure 20

CO2 hydrate distributions—CH4 gas production and CO2 sequestration in gas hydrate reservoir

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