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Research Papers: Petroleum Wells-Drilling/Production/Construction

A Study to Prevent Bottom Water From Coning in Heavy-Oil Reservoirs: Design and Simulation Approaches

[+] Author and Article Information
Binshan Ju1

School of Energy Resources, Key Laboratory of Marine Reservoir Evolution and Hydrocarbon Accumulation Mechanism, Ministry of Education, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing 100083, Chinajubs2936@163.com

Xiaofeng Qiu

Block 1, Building 10, Unit 2, House 202, China University of Petroleum (East China), 271 Beier Road, Dongying, Shandong 257062, P.R.C.

Shugao Dai, Haiqing Wu

 Shengli Oil Field Dongsheng Jinggong Petroleum Development Group Co. Ltd., Dongsheng Mansion, Xisi Road, No. 266, Dongying, Shandong 257000, P.R.C.

Tailiang Fan

School of Energy Resources, Key Laboratory of Marine Reservoir Evolution and Hydrocarbon Accumulation Mechanism, Ministry of Education, China  University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing 100083, China

Xiaodong Wang

School of Energy Resources, Key Laboratory of Marine Reservoir Evolution and Hydrocarbon Accumulation Mechanism, Ministry of Education, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing 100083, China

1

Corresponding author.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 130(3), 033102 (Aug 11, 2008) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2955560 History: Received April 08, 2007; Revised April 20, 2008; Published August 11, 2008

The coning problems for vertical wells and the ridging problems for horizontal wells are very difficult to solve by conventional methods during oil production from reservoirs with bottom water drives. If oil in a reservoir is too heavy to follow Darcy’s law, the problems may become more complicated for the non-Newtonian properties of heavy oil and its rheology. To solve these problems, an innovative completion design with downhole water sink was presented by dual-completion in oil and water columns with a packer separating the two completions for vertical wells or dual-horizontal wells. The design made it feasible that oil is produced from the formation above the oil water contact (OWC) and water is produced from the formation below the OWC, respectively. To predict quantitatively the production performances of production well using the completion design, a new improved mathematical model considering non-Newtonian properties of oil was presented and a numerical simulator was developed. A series of runs of an oil well was employed to find out the best perforation segment and the fittest production rates from the formations above and below OWC. The study shows that the design is effective for heavy oil reservoir with bottom water though it cannot completely eliminate the water cone formed before using the design. It is a discovery that the design is more favorable for new wells and the best perforation site for water sink (Sink 2) is located at the upper 1/3 of the formation below OWC.

Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Water , Reservoirs , Wells
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

The principle of TSIOF

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Figure 2

Well completion configuration

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Figure 3

The relation of apparent viscosity and pressure gradient

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Figure 4

The rhythm of the sand formation

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Figure 5

The oil saturation in each layer from top to bottom

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Figure 6

Grids on the plane

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Figure 7

The relative permeability of oil and water

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Figure 9

Water coning process

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Figure 10

The effects of production rate of Sink 2 on oil production of Sink 1

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Figure 11

The effects of production rate of Sink 2 on water-cut of Sink 1

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Figure 12

The effects of production rate of Sink 2 on the behaviors of water coning

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Figure 13

The effect of perforation location on cumulative oil production

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Figure 14

The effects of production rate of Sink 2 on the behaviors of water coning for a new well

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Figure 15

Comparison of numerical cumulative oil production of old well and new well

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