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Research Papers: Petroleum Wells-Drilling/Production/Construction

NETL Extreme Drilling Laboratory Studies High Pressure High Temperature Drilling Phenomena

[+] Author and Article Information
K. David Lyons, Simone Honeygan, Thomas Mroz

National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, 3610 Collins Ferry Road, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880

J. Energy Resour. Technol 130(4), 043102 (Nov 06, 2008) (4 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3000139 History: Received June 17, 2008; Revised September 02, 2008; Published November 06, 2008

The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) established the Extreme Drilling Laboratory to engineer effective and efficient drilling technologies viable at depths greater than 20,000 ft. This paper details the challenges of ultradeep drilling, documents reports of decreased drilling rates as a result of increasing fluid pressure and temperature, and describes NETL’s research and development activities. NETL is invested in laboratory-scale physical simulation. Its physical simulator will have capability of circulating drilling fluids at 30,000 psi and 480°F around a single drill cutter. This simulator is not yet operational; therefore, the results will be limited to the identification of leading hypotheses of drilling phenomena and NETL’s test plans to validate or refute such theories. Of particular interest to the Extreme Drilling Laboratory’s studies are the combinatorial effects of drilling fluid pressure, drilling fluid properties, rock properties, pore pressure, and drilling parameters, such as cutter rotational speed, weight on bit, and hydraulics associated with drilling fluid introduction to the rock-cutter interface. A detailed discussion of how each variable is controlled in a laboratory setting will be part of the conference paper and presentation.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Drilling , Rocks , Fluids
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Rate of penetration for various rock types using roller-cone bits (3)

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Figure 2

Results from Agreement No. DE-FC26-02NT41657 illustrating the trends of ROP performance in Crab Orchard Sandstone as a function of weight on bit for various drilling fluid systems at a 10,000 psi confining pressure (3)

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Figure 3

Results from Agreement No. DE-FC26-02NT41657 illustrating the trends of ROP performance in Mancos Shale as a function of weight on bit for various drilling fluid systems at a 10,000 psi confining pressure (3)

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Figure 4

Computer-generated rendering of the UDS to be used at NETL to study deep drilling phenomena

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