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Research Papers: Heat Energy Generation/Storage/Transfer

Exergy Analysis of an Industrial Waste Heat Recovery Based Cogeneration Cycle for Combined Production of Power and Refrigeration

[+] Author and Article Information
A. Khaliq1

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street, N. Oshawa, ON, LIH 7K4, Canadaabd_khaliq2001@yahoo.co.in

R. Kumar

Amity School of Engineering and Technology, GGSIPU, New Delhi 110061, India

I. Dincer

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street, North Oshawa, ON, LIH 7K4, Canada

1

Corresponding author. On leave from Department of Mechanical Engineering, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025, India.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 131(2), 022402 (May 28, 2009) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3120381 History: Received March 11, 2008; Revised November 13, 2008; Published May 28, 2009

In this paper, a novel industrial waste heat recovery based cogeneration is proposed for the combined production of power and refrigeration. The system is an integration of Rankine power cycle and absorption refrigeration cycle. A thermodynamic analysis through energy and exergy is employed, and a comprehensive parametric study is performed to investigate the effects of exhaust gas inlet temperature, pinch-point, and gas composition on energy efficiency, power-to-cold ratio, and exergy efficiency of the cogeneration cycle and exergy destruction in each component. The variation in specific heat with exhaust gas composition and temperature is accounted in the analysis for further discussion. The first-law efficiency decreases while power-to-cold ratio and exergy efficiency increase with increasing exhaust gas inlet temperature. The parameters, such as power-to-cold ratio and second-law efficiency, decrease while first-law efficiency increases with increasing pinch-point. Exergy efficiency significantly varies with gas composition and oxygen content of the exhaust gas. Approximating the exhaust gas as air, and the air standard analysis leads to either underestimation or overestimation of cogeneration cycle performance on exergy point of view. Exergy analysis indicates that maximum exergy is destroyed during the steam generation process; which represents around 40% of the total exergy destruction in the overall system. The exergy destruction in each component of the system varies significantly with exhaust gas inlet temperature and pinch-point. The present analysis contributes further information on the role of composition, exhaust gas temperature, and pinch-point influence on the performance of a waste heat recovery based cogeneration system from an exergy point of view.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of combined power and refrigeration cycle used for analysis

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Figure 2

Variation of first-law efficiency with gas composition and exhaust gas inlet temperature; PP=20°C and ṁg=100 kg/s

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Figure 3

Variation of power-to-cold ratio (RP/C) with gas composition and exhaust gas inlet temperature; PP=20°C and ṁg=100 kg/s

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Figure 4

Variation of second-law efficiency (%) with gas composition and exhaust gas inlet temperature; PP=20°C and ṁg=100 kg/s

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Figure 5

Variation of first-law efficiency with gas composition and pinch-point temperature; Tg1=500°C and ṁg=100 kg/s

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Figure 6

Variation of power-to-cold ratio (RP/C) with gas composition and pinch-point temperature; Tg1=500°C and ṁg=100 kg/s

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Figure 7

Variation of second-law efficiency (%) with gas composition and pinch-point temperature; Tg1=500°C and ṁg=100 kg/s

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