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Research Papers: Fuel Combustion

A Simulation Model of a Four-Stroke Spark Ignition Engine Fueled With Landfill Gases and Hydrogen Mixtures

[+] Author and Article Information
Guruprasath Narayanan, S. O. Bade Shrestha

 Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5343

J. Energy Resour. Technol 131(3), 032203 (Aug 18, 2009) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3185344 History: Received November 05, 2007; Revised May 27, 2009; Published August 18, 2009

A simulation model for establishment of performance parameters of a spark ignition engine fueled with landfill gas, methane, and landfill gas-hydrogen mixtures is described. A two zone model was employed to estimate combustion duration, ignition lag, associated mass burning rates, and performance parameters for various operating conditions in an internal combustion engine. The modeling consists of two main modules: (a) a fuel-air and residual gas properties calculation, and (b) equilibrium combustion product properties calculation with 13 species of equilibrium combustion products. The fuel-air and residual gas module calculates gas properties required in compression stroke and the unburned zone of a combustion chamber. The equilibrium combustion products module calculates gas properties for the burned zone during combustion and expansion phases. In addition to engine parameters, combustion duration estimation methods were presented to accommodate the presence of high quantities of diluents such as carbon dioxide and nitrogen in methane to represent landfill gases, generally encountered in practice. Similarly, an effect of the addition of hydrogen in landfill gas on performance of a spark ignition engine was also incorporated in the model. The pressure traces and engine power output parameters were modeled and compared with the experimental observations obtained in a variable compression single cylinder four-stroke spark ignition co-operative fuel research engine for different fuels that include methane, landfill gas, and landfill gas-hydrogen mixtures and found satisfactory agreement. MATLAB was used as the programming software in the model.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Wiebe function fitted for mass fraction burned from the experimental pressure data in the CFR engine with methane as a fuel at a compression ratio of 8.5, spark timing of 25 deg BTDC, equivalence ratio of 0.8, intake temperature of 303 K, intake pressure of 98 kPa, and 600 rpm

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Figure 2

Comparison of the mole fractions of equilibrium combustion species with the published data (3) at a pressure of 30 atm and temperature of 1750 K for isooctane as fuel (symbols are from Ref. 3 and the lines are from program results)

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Figure 3

Comparison of experimental pressure and modeled pressure in the CFR engine with landfill gas as a fuel at a compression ratio of 8.5, spark timing of 25 deg BTDC, equivalence ratio of 1.0, intake temperature of 303 K, intake pressure of 98 kPa, and 600 rpm

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Figure 4

Typical variations of experimentally derived combustion duration versus equivalence ratio in the CFR engine with methane as a fuel at a compression ratio of 8.5, spark timing of 30 deg BTDC, intake temperature of 303 K, intake pressure of 98 kPa, and 600 rpm

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Figure 5

Comparison between estimated combustion duration and corresponding experimental data versus equivalence ratio for two spark timings in the CFR engine with methane as a fuel at a compression ratio of 8.5, intake temperature of 303 K, intake pressure of 98 kPa, and 600 rpm (symbols are experimental data and lines are from program results)

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Figure 6

Comparison between estimated ignition lag and corresponding experimental data vetrsus equivalence ratio for two spark timings in the CFR engine with methane as a fuel at a compression ratio of 8.5, intake temperature of 303 K, intake pressure of 98 kPa, and 600 rpm (symbols are experimental data and lines are from program results)

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Figure 7

Comparison between estimated combustion duration and corresponding experimental data versus equivalence ratio for landfill gas operation in the CFR engine at a compression ratio of 8.5, spark timing of 12 deg BTDC, intake temperature of 303 K, intake pressure of 98 kPa, and 600 rpm

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Figure 8

Comparison between estimated combustion duration and corresponding experimental data versus equivalence ratio for landfill gas with 20% hydrogen operation in the CFR engine at a compression ratio of 12, spark timing of 25 deg BTDC, intake temperature of 303 K, intake pressure of 98 kPa, and 600 rpm

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Figure 9

Comparison between predicted indicated power output and corresponding experimental versus equivalence ratio for methane operation in the CFR engine at a compression ratio of 8.5, spark timing of 12 deg BTDC, intake temperature of 303 K, intake pressure of 98 kPa, and 600 rpm

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Figure 10

Comparison between predicted indicated power output and corresponding experimental data versus equivalence ratio for landfill gas operation and its 3% hydrogen mixture in the CFR engine at a compression ratio of 8.5, spark timing of 25 deg BTDC, intake temperature of 303 K, intake pressure 98 kPa, and 600 rpm

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