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Research Papers

Dynamic Modeling of a Novel Cooling, Heat, Power, and Water Microturbine Combined Cycle

[+] Author and Article Information
ChoonJae Ryu

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, P.O. Box 116300, Gainesville, FL 32611choonjae.ryu@gmail.com

David R. Tiffany

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, P.O. Box 116300, Gainesville, FL 32611ar588@ufl.edu

John F. Crittenden

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, P.O. Box 116300, Gainesville, FL 32611jcrittenden@gmail.com

William E. Lear

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, P.O. Box 116300, Gainesville, FL 32611lear@ufl.edu

S. A. Sherif

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, P.O. Box 116300, Gainesville, FL 32611sasherif@ufl.edu

J. Energy Resour. Technol 132(2), 021006 (Jun 11, 2010) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001567 History: Received February 27, 2009; Revised March 29, 2010; Published June 11, 2010; Online June 11, 2010

The power, water extraction, and refrigeration (PoWER) engine has been investigated for several years as a distributed energy (DE) system among other applications for civilian or military use. Previous literature describing its modeling and experimental demonstration have indicated several benefits, especially when the underlying semiclosed cycle gas turbine is combined with a vapor absorption refrigeration system, the PoWER system described herein. The benefits include increased efficiency, high part-power efficiency, small lapse rate, compactness, low emissions, lower air and exhaust flows (which decrease filtration and duct size), and condensation of fresh water. The present paper describes the preliminary design and its modeling of a modified version of this system as applied to DE, especially useful in regions, which are prone to major grid interruptions due to hurricanes, undercapacity, or terrorism. In such cases, the DE system should support most or all services within an isolated service island, including ice production, so that the influence of the power outage is contained in magnitude and scope. The paper describes the rather straightforward system modifications necessary for ice production. However, the primary focus of the paper is on dynamic modeling of the ice making capacity to achieve significant load-leveling via thermal energy storage during the summer utility peak, hence reducing the electrical capacity requirements for the grid.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Gas turbine flowpath of the PoWER system

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Figure 2

Extended vapor absorption refrigeration system of the PoWER system

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Figure 3

Simple shell and tube heat exchanger

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Figure 4

Lumped wall model

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Figure 5

Control volumes for RHX1 (left) and RHX2 (right)

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Figure 6

Extended VARS SIMULINK model

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Figure 7

Air conditioning hourly load

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Figure 8

Mass change in the stored ice (kg)

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Figure 9

Chilled water use (kg/s)

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Figure 10

Heat gained from surroundings at three evaporators

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Figure 12

Temperature of RHX1

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Figure 13

Temperature of RHX2

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