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Research Papers: Heat Energy Generation/Storage/Transfer

Life Cycle Cost Analysis of a Novel Cooling and Power Gas Turbine Engine

[+] Author and Article Information
Vaibhav Malhotra

 Realization Technologies, Inc., New Delhi 110058, Indiavmalhotra@realization.com

W. E. Lear

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, 237 MAE Building B, P.O. Box 116300, Gainesville, FL 32611-6300lear@ufl.edu

J. R. Khan

 GE Energy, 180 Rotterdam Industrial Park, Building 1/Bay 8, Schenectady, NY 12306jameel.khan@ge.com

S. A. Sherif

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, 232 MAE Building B, P.O. Box 116300, Gainesville, FL 32611-6300sasherif@ufl.edu

J. Energy Resour. Technol 132(4), 042401 (Dec 17, 2010) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003075 History: Received July 07, 2009; Revised November 11, 2010; Published December 17, 2010

A life cycle cost analysis was performed to compare life cycle costs of a novel gas turbine engine to those of a conventional microturbine with similar power capacity. This engine, called the high-pressure regenerative turbine engine (HPRTE), operates on a pressurized semiclosed cycle and is integrated with a vapor absorption refrigeration system. The HPRTE uses heat from its exhaust gases to power the absorption refrigeration unit, which cools the high-pressure compressor inlet of the HPRTE to below ambient temperatures and also produces some external refrigeration. The life cycle cost analysis procedure is based on principles laid out in the Federal Energy Management Program. The influence of different design and economic parameters on the life cycle costs of both technologies is analyzed. The results of this analysis are expressed in terms of the cost ratios of the two technologies. The pressurized nature of the HPRTE leads to compact components resulting in significant savings in equipment cost versus those of a microturbine. Revenue obtained from external refrigeration offsets some of the fuel costs for the HPRTE, thus proving to be a major contributor in cost savings for the HPRTE. For the base case of a high-pressure turbine (HPT) inlet temperature of 1373 K and an exit temperature of 1073 K, the HPRTE showed life cycle cost savings of 7% over a microturbine with a similar power capacity.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Gas and refrigerant flow path for the combined HPRTE-VARS (PoWER) cycle

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Figure 2

Effect of increase in the HPT inlet temperature on the LCCR and PCR. Except for the HPT inlet temperature, all design and economic parameters are kept constant and their base-case values are retained (Tables  12).

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Figure 3

Effect of increase in the HPT exit temperature on the life LCCR and cycle efficiency. Except for the HPT exit temperature, all design and economic parameters are kept constant and their base-case values are retained (Tables  12).

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Figure 4

Effect of increase in the HPT exit temperature on the revenue ratio of the HPRTE. Except for the HPT exit temperature, all design and economic parameters are kept constant and their base-case values are retained (Tables  12).

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Figure 5

Effect of ambient temperature on the LCCR and PCR. Except for the ambient temperature, all design and economic parameters are kept constant and their base-case values are retained (Tables  12).

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Figure 6

Effect of increase in HPC inlet temperature (ambient temperature for the microturbine) on cycle efficiency of the engines. Except for the HPC inlet temperature, all design and economic parameters are kept constant and their base-case values are retained (Tables  12).

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Figure 7

Effect of increase in the recuperator effectiveness on the LCCR and plant cost ratio (PCR). Except for the recuperator effectiveness, all design and economic parameters are kept constant and their base-case values are retained (Tables  12).

Tables

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