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Research Papers: Fuel Combustion

Thermodynamic Properties of Ionized Gases at High Temperatures

[+] Author and Article Information
Kian Eisazadeh-Far

Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department,  Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115

Hameed Metghalchi

Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department,  Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115metghalchi@coe.neu.edu

James C. Keck

Mechanical Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139

J. Energy Resour. Technol 133(2), 022201 (May 26, 2011) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003881 History: Received April 26, 2010; Revised February 25, 2011; Published May 26, 2011; Online May 26, 2011

Thermodynamic properties of ionized gases at high temperatures have been calculated by a new model based on local equilibrium conditions. Calculations have been done for nitrogen, oxygen, air, argon, and helium. The temperature range is 300–100,000 K. Thermodynamic properties include specific heat capacity, density, mole fraction of particles, and enthalpy. The model has been developed using statistical thermodynamics methods. Results have been compared with other researchers and the agreement is good.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

The variation of y0 , y2 , and MA /EA versus temperature during the dissociation process

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Figure 2

Variation of y0ɛ, y0ɛ+1, yɛ versus temperature during the ionization process

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Figure 3

The sketch of equilibrium packages

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Figure 4

Mole fractions of oxygen species versus temperature (“e” represents the electron)

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Figure 5

Mole fractions of nitrogen species versus temperature (“e” represents the electron)

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Figure 6

Mole fractions of argon plasma versus temperature (“e” represents the electron)

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Figure 7

Mole fractions of helium plasma versus temperature (“e” represents the electron)

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Figure 8

Mole fractions of air species versus temperature

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Figure 9

Plasma particle numbers normalized by elemental atom numbers

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Figure 10

Heat capacities of oxygen, nitrogen, argon, and helium versus temperature; (a) helium and argon, (b) air, oxygen, and nitrogen

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Figure 11

enthalpies of different species versus temperature; (a) argon and helium, (b) air, oxygen, and nitrogen

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Figure 12

Heat capacity of air versus temperature and comparison with other researchers (300–5000 K); - - - - ·, Ref. 6; – · · –, Ref. 9;

, Ref. 16; ----, present study

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Figure 13

Heat capacity of air versus temperature and comparison with other researchers (300–100,000 K); - · - · -, Ref. 6; - - - - ·, Ref. 9; ----, present study

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