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Research Papers: Petroleum Wells-Drilling/Production/Construction

Well Completion for Effective Deliquification of Natural Gas Wells

[+] Author and Article Information
John Yilin Wang2

 Sklar Exploration Company, Shreveport, LA 71101 e-mail: john.wang@psu.edu

2

Present address: Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering Program, Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering and EMS Energy Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, 202 Hosler Building, University Park, PA 16802.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 134(1), 013102 (Dec 23, 2011) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005284 History: Received December 13, 2010; Revised September 22, 2011; Published December 23, 2011; Online December 23, 2011

Liquid loading has been a problem in natural gas wells for several decades. With gas fields becoming mature and gas production rates dropping below the critical rate, deliquification becomes more and more critical for continuous productivity and profitability of gas wells. Current methods for solving liquid loading in the wellbore include plunger lift, velocity string, surfactant, foam, well cycling, pumps, compression, swabbing, and gas lift. All these methods are to optimize the lifting of liquid up to surface, which increases the operating cost, onshore, and offshore. However, the near-wellbore liquid loading is critical but not well understood. Through numerical reservoir simulation studies, effect of liquid loading on gas productivity and recovery has been quantified in two aspects: backup pressure and near-wellbore liquid blocking by considering variable reservoir permeability, reservoir pressure, formation thickness, liquid production rate, and geology. Based on the new knowledge, we have developed well completion methods for effective deliquifications. These lead to better field operations and increased ultimate gas recovery.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Flow regimes for gas wells as water phase in dark/blue color and gas phase in white color [9]

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Figure 2

Field tested down-hole gas/water separation and re-injection system [12]

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Figure 3

Relative permeabilities for gas/water two-phase flow inside the reservoir

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Figure 4

Simulation model with gridding of 40× 40× 5 and producer at grids 1× 1× 1–5

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Figure 5

Water saturation distribution 1 year after production with near-wellbore damage, for fourth layer with wellbore on the top left perpendicular to the map

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Figure 6

Water saturation distribution 1 year after production without near-wellbore damage, for fourth layer with wellbore on the top left perpendicular to the map

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Figure 7

Gas production rate versus time for four different cases where pr  = 5580 psi, k = 10 md, Φ = 16%, and h = 20 ft

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Figure 8

Gas production rate versus time for four different cases where pr  = 5580 psi, k = 1 md, Φ = 16%, and h = 20 ft

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Figure 9

Gas production rate versus time for four different cases where pr  = 5580 psi, k = 0.5 md, Φ = 15%, and h = 20 ft

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Figure 10

Gas production rate versus time for four different cases where pr  = 5580 psi, k = 0.1 md, Φ = 13%, and h = 20 ft

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Figure 11

Gas production rate versus time for four different cases where pr  = 1860 psi, k = 0.5 md, Φ = 15%, and h = 20 ft

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