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Fuel Combustion

Investigations on a Compression Ignition Engine Using Animal Fats and Vegetable Oil as Fuels

[+] Author and Article Information
Hamza Bousbaa

 Research Laboratory LTE-ENSET, B.O. 1523 El Mnaour, 31000-Oran, Algeria

Awad Sary

DSEE Department,  Ecole des Mines de Nantes, La chantrerie, 4, Rue Alfred Kastler, BP 20722, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3, France

Mohand Tazerout

DSEE Department,  Ecole des Mines de Nantes, La chantrerie, 4, Rue Alfred Kastler, BP 20722, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3, FranceMohand.tazerout@emn.fr

Abdelkrim Liazid

 Research Laboratory LTE-ENSET, B.O. 1523 El Mnaour, 31000-Oran, Algeriaab_liazid@hotmail.com

J. Energy Resour. Technol 134(2), 022202 (Mar 06, 2012) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005660 History: Received March 27, 2011; Accepted October 12, 2011; Published March 01, 2012; Online March 06, 2012

Biofuels are a promising alternative to petroleum-based fuels. This paper investigates the performance, combustion, and exhaust emissions of a single cylinder diesel engine operated on baseline diesel and biofuel produced by vegetable oil and processing animal fat. The vegetable oil is called PODL20, which is a blend of palm oil and D -Limonen in proportion of 80% and 20%, respectively. The second biofuel is synthesized from the animal fat wastes (WAF) after transesterification process. Both experimental and numerical investigations are achieved in this work. The experiments are conducted at constant engine speed mode (1800 rpm) with applied loads on a wide domain. The CFD code converge is used to simulate the in-cylinder combustion for all the tested fuels. Comparative measures of brake thermal efficiency, break specific fuel consumption (bsfc), exhaust gas temperature, volumetric efficiency, and pollution (THC, CO2 , CO, NO, NOx) are presented and discussed. Also, a step is achieved with in-cylinder CFD simulation of biofuel combustion. The obtained results indicate that the combustion characteristics are slightly changed when comparing neat diesel to biofuels. Some of the results obtained in this work indicate that WAF fuel decreases the total unburned fuel as well as the nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions. The numerical results are in logic agreement with those obtained experimentally, which promotes more detailed investigations and combustion characteristics optimization in forthcoming works.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Overall view of the engine test-rig

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Figure 2

Effect of brake power on brake thermal efficiency

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Figure 3

Effect of brake power on brake specific fuel consumption

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Figure 4

Effect of brake power on exhaust gas temperature

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Figure 5

Effect of brake power on volumetric efficiency

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Figure 6

Effect of brake power on total hydrocarbons THC

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Figure 7

Effect of brake power on NOx

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Figure 8

Effect of brake power on NO

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Figure 9

Effect of brake power on CO

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Figure 10

Effect of brake power on CO2

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Figure 11

Mesh of computational grid domain at two different CA positions

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Figure 12

Comparison of predicted and measured in-cylinder pressure at load, 80%. PODL20 case.

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Figure 13

Comparison of predicted and measured in-cylinder pressure at full load. PODL20 case.

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Figure 14

Comparison of predicted and measured in-cylinder pressure at load, 80%. AF fuel.

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Figure 15

Comparison of predicted and measured in-cylinder pressure at full load. AF fuel.

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Figure 16

Comparison of predicted and measured in-cylinder pressure at load, 80%. Neat diesel case.

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Figure 17

Comparison of predicted and measured in-cylinder pressure at full load. Neat diesel case.

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Figure 18

Heat release for the different fuels, at load 80%

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Figure 19

Heat release for the different fuels, at full load

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Figure 20

In-cylinder average temperature for the different fuels, at load 80%

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Figure 21

In-cylinder average temperature for the different fuels, at full load

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Figure 22

Predicted ignition delays in (ms) as a function of loads

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Figure 23

Temperature contours at heat release peak. Full load case.

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Figure 24

Predicted NOx emissions, at load 80%

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Figure 25

Predicted NOx emissions, at load 100%

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Figure 26

Predicted soot emissions, at load 80%

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Figure 27

Predicted soot emissions, at load 100%

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