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Technical Briefs

Simulation of Gas Pipelines Leakage Using Modified Characteristics Method

[+] Author and Article Information
E. Nourollahi, E. Davarpanah

Faculty of Engineering,  Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, P.O. Box No. 91775-1111, Mashhad, Iran

A. B. Rahimi1

Faculty of Engineering,  Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, P.O. Box No. 91775-1111, Mashhad, Iranrahimiab@yahoo.com

1

Corresponding author.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 134(2), 024501 (Mar 06, 2012) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005697 History: Received November 21, 2009; Accepted December 20, 2011; Published March 01, 2012; Online March 06, 2012

The process of pressure reduction and gas leakage rate (discharge characteristics) of a hole has so far been accomplished by utilizing some zero-dimensional models. In these models, the effects of complex boundaries are ignored. The major aim of this study is simulating the process of pipeline gas leakage by the aid of a modified one-dimensional characteristics model. This model, beside the possibility of modeling the impact of leakage on one-dimensional compressible flow, benefits from introducing a variety of boundary conditions to flow zone. In this approach, hole is considered as an orifice, which makes a path for gas to release in a lower pressure ambient. Also, in this study, the effects of four kinds of boundary conditions at the ends of the pipeline on gas discharge characteristics are investigated.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

(a) Leakage display and waves that produced. (b) The implementation of the leakage effect.

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Figure 2

Location of hole between two nodes

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Figure 3

Grid independency

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Figure 4

State (1) of the boundary conditions: (a) Pressure changes as function of the pipe length at primary times. (b) Changes of the exit mass flux by time.

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Figure 5

State (1) of the boundary conditions: (a) Exit mass flux change as a function of hole area and pipe length. (b) Exit mass flux change as a function of pipe pressure and pipe length.

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Figure 6

State (2) of the boundary conditions: (a) Pressure changes as function of pipe length at primary times. (b) Changes of the exit mass flux by time.

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Figure 7

State (2) of the boundary conditions: (a) Exit mass flux changes as a function of hole area and pipe length. (b) Exit mass flux changes as a function of pipe pressure and pipe length.

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Figure 8

state (3) of the boundary conditions: (a) Pressure changes as function of pipe length at primary times. (b) Changes of the exit mass flux against time.

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Figure 9

State (2) of the boundary conditions: (a) Changes of the exit mass flux as function of hole area and pipe length. (b) Changes of the exit mass flux as function of pipe pressure and pipe length.

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Figure 10

Comparison of mass flow rate with the result of Oke [15]

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