0
Energy Systems Analysis

Multi-Objective Optimization of a Combined Power and Cooling Cycle for Low-Grade and Midgrade Heat Sources

[+] Author and Article Information
Gokmen Demirkaya

Clean Energy Research Center,  University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620gdemirka@mail.usf.edu

Saeb Besarati

Clean Energy Research Center,  University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620sbesarati@mail.usf.edu

Ricardo Vasquez Padilla

Clean Energy Research Center, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620; Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Universidad del Norte, Barranquilla, Colombiarvasquez@uninorte.edu.co

Antonio Ramos Archibold

Clean Energy Research Center, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620; Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Universidad Autonoma del Caribe, Barranquilla, Colombiaantonioramos@mail.usf.edu

D. Yogi Goswami1

Clean Energy Research Center, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620; Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering,  University of South Florida, ENB 118, 4202 E Fowler Avenue, Tampa, FL 33620goswami@usf.edu

Muhammad M. Rahman

Clean Energy Research Center,  University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620mmrahman@usf.edu

Elias L. Stefanakos

Clean Energy Research Center,  University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620stefana@usf.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 134(3), 032002 (May 22, 2012) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005922 History: Received July 14, 2011; Revised December 19, 2011; Published May 21, 2012; Online May 22, 2012

Optimization of thermodynamic cycles is important for the efficient utilization of energy sources; indeed, it is more crucial for the cycles utilizing low-grade heat sources where the cycle efficiencies are smaller compared to high temperature power cycles. This paper presents the optimization of a combined power/cooling cycle, also known as the Goswami cycle, which combines the Rankine and absorption refrigeration cycles. The cycle uses a special binary fluid mixture as the working fluid and produces a power and refrigeration. In this regard, multi-objective genetic algorithms (GAs) are used for Pareto approach optimization of the thermodynamic cycle. The optimization study includes two cases. In the first case, the performance of the cycle is evaluated as it is used as a bottoming cycle and in the second case, as it is used as a top cycle utilizing solar energy or geothermal sources. The important thermodynamic objectives that have been considered in this work are, namely, work output, cooling capacity, effective first law, and exergy efficiencies. Optimization is carried out by varying the selected design variables, such as boiler temperature and pressure, rectifier temperature, and basic solution concentration. The boiler temperature is varied between 70–150 °C and 150–250 °C for the first and the second cases, respectively.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Schematic description of the combined power/cooling cycle

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Comparison of ammonia–water mixture saturated liquid and vapor enthalpy and entropy by Xu and Goswami [25] and Tillner-Roth and Friend [26]

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Critical temperature and pressure of the ammonia–water mixture

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Bubble and dew pressure of the ammonia–water mixture at 250 °C

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Combined power and cooling cycle output as an example

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Rectifier temperature limits

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Pareto front of cooling and first law efficiency with respect to net work output

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Pareto front of first law efficiency and work with respect to exergy efficiency

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Pareto front of first and exergy efficiencies with respect to cooling

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Temperature-entropy (a) and concentration-enthalpy (b) diagrams of the combined power/cooling cycle

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Comparison of ammonia–water mixture saturation pressures by Xu and Goswami [25] and Tillner-Roth and Friend [26]

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In