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Research Papers: Fuel Combustion

On the Relationship Between Fuel Injection Pressure and Two-Stage Ignition Behavior of Low Temperature Diesel Combustion

[+] Author and Article Information

Contributed by the Internal Combustion Engine Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Energy Resources Technology. Manuscript received January 18, 2012; final manuscript received May 28, 2012; published online August 31, 2012. Editor: Hameed Metghalchi.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 134(4), 042201 (Aug 31, 2012) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4007252 History: Received January 18, 2012; Revised May 28, 2012

In previous work, it is reported that increased dilution at midrange injection pressures produces longer first stage combustion duration. There is also corresponding decreases in nitric oxide concentrations and smoke number with respect to a reference conventional combustion mode. Continuing this effort, the objective of this study is to investigate the effect of injection pressure on the first stage ignition duration under low temperature combustion (LTC) conditions. A sweep of injection pressure is performed and the resulting heat (energy) release profiles are examined. The ignition delay behavior is expected based on changing injection pressure, but the first stage ignition duration does not follow expected trends based on initial literature review. It is postulated that the influence of injection pressure on the local equivalence ratios is causing the observed behavior. The appropriate measurement and analysis tools are not available to the authors to confirm this postulation. A literature review of work investigating ignition conditions in low temperature combustion modes is used to support the postulation made in this study.

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References

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Bonner, B. H., and Tipper, C. F. H., 1965, “The Cool Flame Combustion of Hydrocarbons II—Propane and n-Heptane,” Combust. Flame, 9(4), pp. 387–392. [CrossRef]
Burgess, A. R., and Laughlin, R. G. W., 1972, “The Cool-Flame Oxidation of n-Heptane. Part I. The Kinetic Features of the Reaction,” Combust. Flame, 19(3), pp. 315–329. [CrossRef]
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Figures

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Fig. 1

Illustration of definitions of start of combustion and start of rapid heat (energy) release

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Fig. 2

Brake specific nitric oxide emission versus filter smoke number. Illustrates that the late timing achieves simultaneous low NO and FSN.

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Fig. 3

Apparent heat (energy) release rates for the range of injection pressures at the conventional injection timing with no (0%) EGR

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Fig. 4

Apparent heat (energy) release rates for the range of injection pressures at the late injection timing with about 52% EGR

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Fig. 5

Ignition delay for both injection timings as fuel rail pressure is swept

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Fig. 6

Calculated in-cylinder temperature at injection for conventional injection timings as fuel rail pressure is swept

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Fig. 7

Intake manifold conditions for the conventional injection timing

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Fig. 8

First stage ignition duration (deg) for the late injection timing as fuel rail pressure is swept

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Fig. 9

In-cylinder pressure at ignition for the late injection timing as fuel rail pressure is swept

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