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Energy Extraction From Natural Resources

Postconsumer Plastic Waste Over Post-Use Cracking Catalysts for Producing Hydrocarbon Fuels

[+] Author and Article Information
Yeuh-Hui Lin

e-mail: t50027@cc.kyu.edu.tw

Mu-Hoe Yang

Department of Greenergy,
Kao Yuan University,
Kaohsiung 821, Taiwan, ROC

Sheau-Long Lee

Department of Chemistry,
Chinese Military Academy,
Kaohsiung 830, Taiwan, ROC

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Petroleum Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Energy Resources Technology. Manuscript received April 10, 2012; final manuscript received August 13, 2012; published online November 15, 2012. Assoc. Editor: Sarma V. Pisupati.

J. Energy Resour. Technol. 135(1), 011701 (Nov 15, 2012) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4007661 History: Received April 10, 2012; Revised August 13, 2012

The recycling of plastic waste is important both in the conservation of resources and the environment. A plastic waste (polyethylene(PE)/polypropylene(PP)/polystyrene(PS)/polyvinyl chloride(PVC)) was pyrolyzed over a series of post-use fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts using a fluidizing reaction system similar to the FCC process operating isothermally at ambient pressure. Experiments carried out with these catalysts gave good yields of valuable hydrocarbons with differing selectivity in the final products dependent on reaction conditions. A model based on kinetic considerations associated with chemical reactions and catalyst deactivation in the catalytic degradation of plastics has been developed. Greater product selectivity was observed with a hybrid catalyst (SAHA/CAT-R1) of amorphous silica-aluminas (SAHA) and a recycle FCC catalyst with regeneration (CAT-R1) with more than 68.6 wt. % olefins products. It is demonstrated that the catalytic degradation of postconsumer plastics over these recycled catalysts using fluidizing cracking reactions was shown to be a useful method for the production of potentially valuable hydrocarbons.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic diagram of a catalytic fluidized-bed reactor system: (1) feeder, (2) furnace, (3) sintered distributor, (4) fluidised catalyst, (5) reactor, (6) condenser, (7) flow meter, (8) 16-loop automated sample system, (9) gas bag, (10) GC, and (11) digital controller for three-zone furnace

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Fig. 2

A kinetic/mechanistic reaction scheme for the degradation of postconsumer plastic waste (PE/PP/PS/PVC) over various catalysts

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Fig. 3

Comparison of hydrocarbon yields as a function of time for the catalytic degradation of postconsumer plastic mixture (PE/PP/PS/PVC) at 390 °C over different catalysts (catalyst to plastic ratio = 30 wt. %, rate of fluidization gas = 600 ml min−1 and catalyst particle size = 125–180 μm)

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Fig. 4

Comparison of hydrocarbon yields as a function of time at different reaction temperatures for the catalytic degradation of postconsumer polymer mixture (PE/PP/PS/PVC) over CAT-R1 catalyst (rate of fluidization gas = 600 ml min−1, catalyst to plastic ratio = 30 wt. % and catalyst particle size = 125–180 μm)

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Fig. 5

Comparison of hydrocarbon yields as a function of time at different fluidization gas for the degradation of postconsumer polymer mixture (PE/PP/PS/PVC) over CAT-R1 catalyst (reaction temperature = 390 °C, catalyst to plastic ratio = 30 wt. % and catalyst particle size = 125–180 μm)

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Fig. 6

Comparison of calculated (m) and experimental (e) results for the degradation of postconsumer plastic mixture (PE/PP/PS/PVC) over (a) CAT-C1, (b) CAT-R1, and (c) CAT-C3 catalysts at 390 °C (catalyst particle size = 125–180 μm, fluidizing N2 rate = 600 ml min−1 and catalyst to plastic ratio = 30% wt./wt.)

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