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Research Papers: Petroleum Engineering

Fracture Height Containment in the Stimulation of Oriskany Formation

[+] Author and Article Information
Tushar Vatsa

Bechtel Corporation in Houston,
Houston, TX 77056;
The Pennsylvania State University,
Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering Program,
Penn State Department of Energy and Mineral
Engineering and EMS Energy Institute,
202 Hosler Building,
University Park, PA 16802
e-mail: tushar_vts@yahoo.com

John Yilin Wang

The Pennsylvania State University,
Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering Program,
Penn State Department of Energy and Mineral
Engineering and EMS Energy Institute,
202 Hosler Building,
University Park, PA 16802
e-mail: john.wang@psu.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Petroleum Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Energy Resources Technology. Manuscript received December 20, 2011; final manuscript received December 7, 2012; published online March 21, 2013. Assoc. Editor: W. David Constant.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 135(2), 022902 (Mar 21, 2013) (12 pages) Paper No: JERT-11-1174; doi: 10.1115/1.4023169 History: Received December 20, 2011; Revised December 07, 2012

The Oriskany sandstone formation has been a prolific producer of natural gas in the Appalachian basin since 1930s. Lot of production wells have been converted to gas storage wells for the ease of operation. Natural gas storage industry is a vital part of North American energy driven economy because of the fluctuation in seasonal demand and in maintaining the reliability of supply needed to meet the demands of the consumer. However, the storage wells suffer from an annual deliverability loss of 5% owing to the various damage mechanisms. A lot of work pertaining to the issue of identification of damage mechanisms and subsequent development of stimulation technology in order to mitigate the damage and restore the wells deliverability have been done in a joint effort between The Gas Research Institute, Department of Energy, American Gas Association and the various other operator companies involved in the storage industry. Operators mostly rely on traditional methods such as blowing, washing, reperforating, acidizing, infill drilling to restore wells deliverability. These traditional methods do provide short term benefits, but the longevity is not sustained and the overall situation remains same. Hydraulic fracturing is not preferred in terms of legitimate concerns over excessive vertical height growth, long fracture fluid cleanup times, lack of expertise and cost. This research study was carried out to understand the various damage mechanisms affecting the Oriskany wells, with a focus on gas storage wells. We then developed a dataset of reservoir properties, rock properties and fracture treatment data for Oriskany based on a complete literature review and calculations from a sonic log. Parametrical studies were carried out to investigate the effect of type of fracture fluids, injection rate, types of proppant, treatment volume, reservoir pressure and treatment schedule on fracture geometries in the Oriskany formation. Based on the results, we developed new stimulation methods that lead to increased well deliverability, fracture height containment, and higher average fracture conductivity. This new understanding and knowledge help in practicing engineers design better treatments in stimulating Oriskany wells.

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Average fracture conductivity for different fracture fluids at constat injection rate of 10 bpm

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Fig. 2

Average fracture height for different fracture fluids at constat injection rate of 10 bpm

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Fig. 3

Effect of proppant on fracture conductivity for binary foam fluid

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Fig. 4

Effect of proppant on fracture conductivity for linear gel of 40 lbm/1000 gal

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Fig. 5

Effect of proppant on fracture conductivity for crosslinked gel of 40 lbm/1000 gal

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Fig. 6

Effect of treatment volume on fracture conductivity for binary foam fluid

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Fig. 7

Effect of treatment volume on vertical fracture height for binary foam fluid

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Fig. 8

Effect of treatment volume on fracture conductivity for linear gel of 40 lbm/1000 gal

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Fig. 9

Effect of treatment volume on vertical fracture height for linear gel of 40 lbm/1000 gal

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Fig. 10

Effect of treatment volume on fracture conductivity for crosslinked gel of 40 lbm/1000 gal

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Fig. 11

Effect of treatment volume on vertical fracture height for crosslinked gel of 40 lbm/1000 gal

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Fig. 12

Effect of reservoir pressure on fracture conductivity in Oriskany wells

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Fig. 13

Effect of reservoir pressure on fracture height in Oriskany wells

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Fig. 14

Effect of reservoir pressure on fracture length in Oriskany wells

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Fig. 15

Effect of treatment schedule on fracture conductivity for binary foam fluid

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Fig. 16

Effect of treatment schedule on fracture conductivity for linear gel of 40 lbm/1000 gal

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 17

Effect of treatment schedule on fracture conductivity for crosslinked gel of 40 lbm/1000 gal

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