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Technical Briefs

Visualization of Two-Dimensional Excitation Temperatures in CH4/N2/Ar Plasmas for Preparation of Carbonaceous Materials

[+] Author and Article Information
Qingchun Shen

Department of Applied Chemistry,
Graduate School of Engineering,
Nagoya University,
Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603, Japan
e-mail: shin.keishiyun@h.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp

Yasushi Miyata

Nagoya Municipal Industrial Research Institute,
3-4-41, Rokuban, Atsuta-ku,
Nagoya 456-0058, Japan
e-mail: miyata@nmiri.city.nagoya.jp

Shigeaki Morita

Associate Professor
Department of Engineering Science,
Osaka Electro-Communication University,
18-8 Hatsucho, Neyagawa 572-8530, Japan

Yoshinobu Baba

Professor
Department of Applied Chemistry,
Graduate School of Engineering,
Nagoya University,
Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603, Japan

Kuniyuki Kitagawa

Professor
EcoTopia Science Institute,
Nagoya University,
Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603, Japan

Ashwani K. Gupta

Professor
The Combustion Laboratory,
University of Maryland,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
College Park, MD 20742
e-mail: akgupta@umd.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Advanced Energy Systems Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Energy Resources Technology. Manuscript received January 21, 2013; final manuscript received January 25, 2013; published online April 29, 2013. Editor: Hameed Metghalchi.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 135(3), 034501 (Apr 29, 2013) (3 pages) Paper No: JERT-13-1028; doi: 10.1115/1.4023744 History: Received January 21, 2013; Revised January 25, 2013

Analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) distribution of excited Ar atoms has been made to synthesize better anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. The 2D visualization of excitation temperatures was based on the “two-line” method, which are important to diagnose the plasmas used for the preparation of carbonaceous materials by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The results showed that the excitation temperature in N2-rich (CH4-lean) plasma was lower than that in N2-lean (CH4-rich), and is attributed to different excitation and reaction mechanisms of CH4 and N2.

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References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Visualizations of 2D excitation temperature for CH4/H2/Ar plasmas together with their emission intensity distributions at 750.4 and 811.5 nm; (a), (e), (i) for CH4-rich (N2-lean) plasma without bias voltage; (b), (f), (j) for CH4-rich (N2-lean) plasma with a bias voltage of −100 V; (c), (g), (k) for CH4-lean (N2-rich) plasma without bias voltage; (d), (h), (l) for CH4-lean (N2-rich) plasma with a bias voltage of −100 V

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Boltzmann plots of argon atoms in different CH4/N2/Ar plasmas; (a) CH4-rich (N2-lean) plasma without bias voltage; (b) CH4-rich (N2-lean) plasma with a bias voltage of −100 V; (c) CH4-lean (N2- rich) plasma without bias voltage; (d) CH4-lean (N2- rich) plasma with a bias voltage of −100 V

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Emission spectrum from CH4/N2/Ar plasmas; (a) CH4-rich (N2-lean) plasma without bias voltage; (b) CH4-rich (N2-lean) plasma with a bias voltage of −100 V; (c) CH4-lean (N2- rich) plasma without bias voltage; (d) CH4-lean (N2- rich) plasma with a bias voltage of −100 V

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