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Research Papers: Air Emissions From Fossil Fuel Combustion

Detailed Kinetic Modeling of Soot-Particle and Key-Precursor Formation in Laminar Premixed and Counterflow Diffusion Flames of Fossil Fuel Surrogates

[+] Author and Article Information
Ali Salavati-Zadeh

Ph.D. Candidate
e-mail: alisalavati@ut.ac.ir

Vahid Esfahanian

Professor
e-mail: evahid@ut.ac.ir

Asghar Afshari

Assistant Professor
e-mail: afsharia@ut.ac.ir
School of Mechanical Engineering,
College of Engineering,
University of Tehran,
Tehran, Iran

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Internal Combustion Engine Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received April 16, 2012; final manuscript received September 1, 2012; published online May 24, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Professor Kevin M. Lyons.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 135(3), 031101 (May 24, 2013) (13 pages) Paper No: JERT-12-1075; doi: 10.1115/1.4023302 History: Received April 16, 2012; Revised September 01, 2012

This study reports a chemical kinetics soot model for combustion of engine-relevant fuels. The scheme accounts for both low- and high-temperature oxidation, considering their crucial role in engine combustion process. The mechanism is validated against several ignition delay times and laminar burning velocities data sets for single and mixtures of hydrocarbons. To assess the mechanism ability to predict soot precursors, formation of aromatic and aliphatic species with critical effects on soot formation is investigated for several laminar premixed and diffusion flames. The model includes soot particle inception, surface growth, coagulation, and aggregation based on the method of moments. The performance of the model is evaluated by predicting the amount of produced soot during heavy alkanes and aromatic species mixtures pyrolysis. The results are encouraging, proving this methodology to be a suitable tool to simulate the all-round combustion features of engine fuel surrogates by a single reaction model.

Copyright © 2013 by ASME
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Figures

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Fig. 1

Ignition delay times for methane. (a) p = 2 bars and φ=0.5, (b) p = 2 bars and φ=1, and (c) p = 2 bars and φ=2.

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Fig. 2

Ignition delay times for benzene. (a) p = 2.3 bars and φ=0.5, (b) p = 2.5 bars and φ=1, and (c) p = 2.5 bars and φ=2.

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Fig. 3

Ignition delay times for toluene. (a) p = 2.3 bars and φ=0.33, (b) φ=1 at three pressures, and (c) p = 1.5 bars and φ=1.1.

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Fig. 4

Ignition delay times for n-heptane. (a) φ=0.5 at two pressures, (b) φ=1 at three pressures, and (c) φ=2 at two pressures.

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Fig. 5

Ignition delay times for iso-octane at two pressures. (a) φ=0.5, (b) φ=1, and (c) φ=2.

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Fig. 6

Ignition delay times for n-decane at three pressures. (a) φ=0.5, (b) φ=1, and (c) φ=1.5.

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Fig. 7

Ignition delay times for binary and ternary mixtures of species. (a) n-heptane/toluene (90/10%vol) at p = 40 bars, (b) iso-octane/toluene (90/10%vol) at p = 40 bars, and (c) iso-octane/toluene/n-heptane (69/2014/17%vol) at φ=1.

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Fig. 8

Laminar premixed flame speeds for (a) methane at p = 1 bar, (b) benzene at p = 3 bars, and (c) toluene at p = 3 bars.

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Fig. 9

Laminar premixed flame speeds for (a) n-heptane, (b) iso-octane, (c) n-decane, and (d) iso-octane/n-heptane (87/13%vol)

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Fig. 10

Spatial variation for benzene premixed flame soot precursors (a) benzene and (b) acetylene. Symbol is the experimental data, dashed line is the previous numerical results, and the solid line the current model.

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Fig. 11

Spatial variation for n-heptane premixed flame soot precursors (a) benzene, (b) acetylene, (c) ethylene, (d) allene, and (e) propyne. Symbol is the experimental data, dashed line is the previous numerical results, and the solid line is the current model.

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Fig. 12

Spatial variation for iso-octane premixed flame soot precursors (a) benzene, (b) acetylene, (c) ethylene, (d) allene, and (e) propyne. Symbol is the experimental data, dashed line is the previous numerical results, and the solid line is the current model.

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Fig.13

Spatial variation for n-decane premixed flame soot precursors (a) benzene, (b) acetylene, (c) ethylene, and (d) allene. Symbol is the experimental data, dashed is line the previous numerical results, and the solid line is the current model.

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Fig. 14

Spatial variation for n-heptane diffusion flame soot precursors: (a) benzene, (b) acetylene, (c) ethylene, (d) allene, and (e) propyne. Symbol is the experimental data, dashed line is the previous numerical results, and the solid line is the current model.

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Fig. 15

Soot volume fraction for (a) methane isobaric premixed flat flames at three equivalence ratios, (b) methane diffusion flames at five initial fuel temperature, and (c) toluene premixed flat flames at three pressures and equivalence ratios

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Fig. 16

Soot yield for (a) n-heptane, (b) n-heptane and toluene blend, and (c) iso-octane and toluene blend

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