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Research Papers: Petroleum Engineering

Subsea Electrical Submersible Pump Significance in Petroleum Offshore Production

[+] Author and Article Information
Oldrich Joel Romero

Federal University of Espirito Santo – UFES,
UFES SPE Student Chapter,
GPETRO/CNPq,
Rodovia BR 101 Norte, km 60, Litoraneo,
Sao Mateus, ES 29932-540, Brazil
e-mail: oldrichjoel@gmail.com

Anderson Hupp

Well Site Drilling Engineer,
PetroReconcavo SA, Brazil

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Petroleum Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received October 17, 2012; final manuscript received August 13, 2013; published online September 12, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Christopher J. Wajnikonis.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 136(1), 012902 (Sep 12, 2013) (8 pages) Paper No: JERT-12-1245; doi: 10.1115/1.4025258 History: Received October 17, 2012; Revised August 13, 2013

The use of pumping methods in offshore applications has become common especially in viscous oil production. This follow from the fact they present better efficiency and higher production rate than other lift methods when used in the same conditions, for instance gas lift. Thus, a lift method that has been often used on this scenario due to its satisfactory results is the subsea electrical submersible pump (subsea ESP). This article presents the modeling and simulations of petroleum production facilities equipped with subsea ESP using a commercial software package, the pipesim® from Schlumberger. The production facilities consist of a single vertical producing well completed through its whole thickness in an offshore reservoir. It has been proposed two configurations differing only on the location of the equipment. In the first case, the subsea ESP was installed inside the wellbore and, in the second case on the seabed downstream the wet X-tree. The production rate was simulated for both cases, allowing comparison of the results of each configuration.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

(a) typical centrifugal pump configuration and (b) two pump stages, modified from Ref. [21]

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Fig. 2

Well equipped with ESP system inside the tubing string, case 1 (source: Ref. [28])

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Fig. 3

System equipped with ESP inside the false well, case 2 (source: Ref. [28])

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Fig. 4

Schematic representation of Nodal Analysis®, modified from Ref. [31]

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Fig. 5

Well equipped with ESP bottom wellbore (case 1), in pipesim® symbology

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Fig. 6

Representation in pipesim® symbology for the well equipped with ESP on the seabed (case 2)

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Fig. 7

IPR e TPR curves of reservoir/well system

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Fig. 8

Pressure over the path traveled by the fluid for the case 1

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Fig. 9

Pressure over the path traveled by the fluid for the case 2

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Fig. 10

IPR e TPR curves to the case 1, conventional ESP system

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Fig. 11

Alteration caused on the TPR by the addition of stages at the pump, case 1

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Fig. 12

Alteration caused on the TPR by the addition of stages at the pump, case 2

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Fig. 13

Production rate case 1 (square marker) and case 2 (circular marker)

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