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Research Papers: Fuel Combustion

Contribution Ratio Study of Fuel Alcohol and Gasoline on the Alcohol and Hydrocarbon Emissions of a Gasohol Engine

[+] Author and Article Information
Yanju Wei, Kun Wang, Wenrui Wang, Shenghua Liu

School of Energy and Power Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710049, China

Yajing Yang

State Key Laboratory for Strength and
Vibration of Mechanical Structures,
School of Aerospace,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710049, China
e-mail: yjyang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Internal Combustion Engine Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received September 28, 2012; final manuscript received May 14, 2013; published online November 26, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Timothy J. Jacobs.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 136(2), 022201 (Nov 26, 2013) (7 pages) Paper No: JERT-12-1219; doi: 10.1115/1.4024716 History: Received September 28, 2012; Revised May 14, 2013

Methanol (CH3OH) and ethanol (C2H5OH) are generally called alcohol. They can be mixed with gasoline to fuel SI engine. The fuel blends of alcohol and gasoline are named gasohol. Alcohol emission characteristics and the contributions of fuel on hydrocarbon (HC) emission were experimentally investigated on a three-cylinder, electronic controlled, spark ignition JL368Q3 engine when it ran on 10 (v/v) %, 20 (v/v) %, and 85 (v/v) % methanol/gasoline and ethanol/gasoline fuel blends. Experimental results show that, the value of alcohol emission rates (g alcohol emission per kg alcohol fuel, g/kg.) is a decreasing exponential function of exhaust temperature with high correlation; regardless of the alcohol fraction in fuel blends, the CH3OH emission rate is no more than 8%, while that of C2H5OH no more than 35%. The emission rate of nonalcohol HC was one grade higher than the alcohol emission rate; the minimum HC emission rate occurs at middle and high engine loads, it is around 40% for methanol/gasoline blends and about 50% for ethanol/gasoline blends. Gasoline is the main source of HC emission of gasohol engine, methanol contributes no more than 8% while ethanol no more than 25% on HC emission.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Matrix of test point settings

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Fig. 2

Load characteristics of alcohol emissions from 10(v/v)% alcohol/gasoline blends fueled engine

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Fig. 3

Alcohol emissions characteristics varying with exhaust temperature of 10(v/v)% alcohol/gasoline blend fueled engine

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Fig. 4

HC emission characteristics of 10(v/v)% alcohol/gasoline blend fueled engine

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Fig. 5

Relative emission ratio of alcohol to HC of 10(v/v)% alcohol/gasoline blend fueled engine

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Fig. 6

Alcohol emissions characteristics varying with exhaust temperature of 85 (v/v)% alcohol/gasoline blend fueled engine

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Fig. 7

HC emission characteristics of 85 (v/v)% alcohol/gasoline blend fueled engine

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Fig. 8

Relative emission ratio of alcohol to HC of 85(v/v)% alcohol/gasoline blend fueled engine

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Fig. 9

Alcohol emission rates versus cyclic supplied fuel alcohol

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Fig. 10

HC emission rates versus cyclic supplied fuel alcohol

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Fig. 11

Relative emission ratio of alcohol to HC of alcohol/gasoline blend fueled engine

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