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Research Papers: Alternative Energy Sources

Thermal Optimization of a Solar Thermal Cooling Cogeneration Plant at Low Temperature Heat Recovery

[+] Author and Article Information
T. Srinivas

CO2 Research and Green Technologies Centre,
School of Mechanical and Building Sciences,
VIT University,
Vellore 632 014, India
e-mail: srinivastpalli@yahoo.co.in

B. V. Reddy

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Sciences,
University of Ontario Institute of Technology,
2000 Simcoe Street North,
Oshawa, ON, L1H 7K4, Canada

1Corresponding author. Current address: Faculty of Engineering and Applied Sciences, UOIT, Canada as Post Doctoral Fellow.

Contributed by the Advanced Energy Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received June 17, 2013; final manuscript received November 23, 2013; published online February 20, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Gunnar Tamm.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 136(2), 021204 (Feb 20, 2014) (10 pages) Paper No: JERT-13-1181; doi: 10.1115/1.4026202 History: Received June 17, 2013; Revised November 23, 2013

A simple cooling cogeneration has been developed by coupling a Kalina cycle system (KCS) with a vapor absorption refrigeration (VAR) system. The working fluid used in this theoretical thermodynamic evaluation is ammonia water mixture. A low temperature heat recovery (150 °C–200 °C) from engine exhaust gas, solar collectors, or similar can be used to operate the plant. A controlling facility is provided to set the required amount of power or cooling to meet the variable demand. In this proposed plant, the liquid refrigerant absorbs more amount of heat from evaporator surroundings with a flow control located in between power and cooling cycles. The extra included components are condenser, heat exchanger and throttling device over KCS plant. Due to possibility of more cooling, it offers high energy utilization factor (EUF). The coupled plant characteristics are studied with changes in mass split ratio, separator vapor fraction, separator temperature, and turbine concentration to develop efficient working conditions. The power mass split ratio is varied from 80% to 100% to run the coupled plant at nearly full load conditions. The separator vapor fraction and temperature are optimized at 45% and 150 °C, respectively. It is recommended to maintain the turbine concentration above 0.85 for optimum power and cooling. The maximum cycle EUF and plant EUF are 0.15 and 0.06, respectively, at 80% power mass split ratio. The specific power and specific cooling at these conditions are 62 kW/kg and 72 kW/kg, respectively.

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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Schematic flow diagram of Kalina power plant, CW: cooling water; HT RGN: high temperature regenerator; LT RGN: low temperature regenerator; MXR: mixer; MXT: mixture turbine; SEP: separator; SH: superheater; THR: throttling.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Schematic flow diagram of the proposed cooling and power system with hot fluid source coming from solar concentrating collectors (Kalina + VAR), CW: cooling water; HEX: heat exchanger; MXR: mixer; MXT: mixture turbine; SEP: separator; SH: superheater; THR: throttling.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

(a) Enthalpy-concentration and (b) temperature-entropy diagram for coupled power and cooling cycle at power mass splitter ratio of 0.8, vapor fraction of 0.45, separator temperature of 150 °C and turbine concentration of 0.95.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Performance variations of coupled power and cooling system with power mass split ratio and separator vapor fraction at separator temperature of 150 °C and turbine concentration of 0.95

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Performance variations of coupled power and cooling system with power mass split ratio and separator temperature at vapor fraction of 0.45 and turbine concentration of 0.95

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Performance variations of coupled power and cooling system with power mass split ratio and turbine concentration at vapor fraction of 0.45 and separator temperature of 150 °C

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