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Research Papers: Fuel Combustion

Lean Partially Premixed Combustion Investigation of Methane Direct-Injection Under Different Characteristic Parameters

[+] Author and Article Information
Omid Askari

Department of Mechanical
and Industrial Engineering,
Northeastern University,
Boston, MA 02115
e-mail: askari.o@husky.neu.edu

Hameed Metghalchi

Department of Mechanical
and Industrial Engineering,
Northeastern University,
Boston, MA 02115
e-mail: metghalchi@coe.neu.edu

Siamak Kazemzadeh Hannani

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Sharif University of Technology,
Tehran 11155-8639, Iran
e-mail: hannani@sharif.edu

Hadis Hemmati

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
IAUCTB University,
Tehran 14168-94351, Iran
e-mail: hadismech@gmail.com

Reza Ebrahimi

Department of Aerospace Engineering,
KNTU University of Technology,
Tehran 19991-43344, Iran
e-mail: rebrahimi@kntu.ac.ir

Contributed by the Internal Combustion Engine Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received June 17, 2013; final manuscript received December 4, 2013; published online February 20, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Timothy J. Jacobs.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 136(2), 022202 (Feb 20, 2014) (7 pages) Paper No: JERT-13-1184; doi: 10.1115/1.4026204 History: Received June 17, 2013; Revised December 04, 2013

The effects of hydrogen addition, diluent addition, injection pressure, chamber pressure, chamber temperature and turbulence intensity on methane–air partially premixed turbulent combustion have been studied experimentally using a constant volume combustion chamber (CVCC). The fuel–air mixture was ignited by centrally located electrodes at given spark delay times of 1, 5, 40, 75, and 110 ms. Experiments were performed for a wide range of hydrogen volumetric fractions (0% to 40%), simulated diluent volumetric fractions (0% to 25% as a diluent), injection pressures (30–90 bar), chamber pressures (1–3 bar), chamber temperatures (298–432 K) and overall equivalence ratios of 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0. Flame propagation images via the Schlieren/Shadowgraph technique, combustion characteristics via pressure derived parameters and pollutant concentrations were analyzed for each set of conditions. The results showed that peak pressure and maximum rate of pressure rise increased with the increase in chamber pressure and temperature while changing injection pressure had no considerable effect on pressure and maximum rate of pressure rise. The peak pressure and maximum rate of pressure rise increased, while combustion duration decreased with simultaneous increase of hydrogen content. The lean burn limit of methane–air turbulent combustion was improved with hydrogen addition. Addition of diluent increased combustion instability and misfiring while decreasing the emission of nitrogen oxides (NOx).

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Injection duration setting for various (a) hydrogen fractions and (b) diluent fractions as a function of equivalence ratio

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Fig. 2

Methane distribution around the spark discharge location at two different spark delay times (a) Tsd = 1 ms and (b) Tsd = 5 ms at equivalence ratio of 0.6

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Fig. 3

Effect of injection pressure on peak pressure and maximum rate of pressure rise at chamber pressure of 1 bar, chamber temperature of 298 K and spark delay time of 1 ms for equivalence ratios of 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0

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Fig. 4

Effect of injection pressure on initial combustion duration at different spark delay times at chamber pressure of 1 bar and chamber temperature of 298 K for equivalence ratios of 1.0 and 0.6

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Fig. 5

Effect of chamber temperature and chamber pressure on peak pressure at injection pressure of 90 bar, spark delay time of 1 ms and equivalence ratios of 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0

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Fig. 6

Effect of chamber temperature and chamber pressure on maximum rate of pressure rise at injection pressure of 90 bar, spark delay time of 1 ms and equivalence ratios of 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0

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Fig. 7

Effect of chamber temperature and chamber pressure on main combustion duration at injection pressure of 90 bar, spark delay time of 1 ms and equivalence ratios of 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0

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Fig. 8

Effect of hydrogen addition on flame propagating process at four different times after spark ignition (1.0, 2.4, 3.9, and 5.4 ms), injection pressure of 90 bar, spark delay time of 1 ms and equivalence ratio of 0.8

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Fig. 9

Effect of hydrogen addition on peak pressure and maximum rate of pressure rise at injection pressure of 90 bar, chamber pressure of 1 bar, chamber temperature of 298 K and spark delay time of 1 ms for equivalence ratios of 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0

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Fig. 10

Effect of hydrogen addition on main combustion duration and NOx concentration at injection pressure of 90 bar, chamber pressure of 1 bar, chamber temperature of 298 K and spark delay time of 1 ms for equivalence ratios of 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0

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Fig. 11

Effect of diluent addition on peak pressure at injection pressure of 90 bar, chamber pressure of 1 bar, chamber temperature of 298 K and equivalence ratios of 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 for different spark delay times

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Fig. 12

Snapshots of combustion instability as a function of time after spark in diluent fraction of 25%, spark delay time of 40 ms and equivalence ratio of 1.0

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Fig. 13

Effect of diluent addition on maximum rate of pressure rise, main combustion duration and NOx concentration at injection pressure of 90 bar, chamber pressure of 1 bar, chamber temperature of 298 K and spark delay time of 110 ms for equivalence ratios of 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0

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