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Research Papers: Petroleum Engineering

Transient Simulation of Wellbore Pressure and Temperature During Gas-Well Testing

[+] Author and Article Information
Tong Liu

State Key Laboratory of Oil and Gas Reservoir
Geology and Exploitation Engineering,
Southwest Petroleum University,
Chengdu, 610500 Sichuan, China
e-mail: liutong697@126.com

Hai-quan Zhong

State Key Laboratory of Oil and Gas Reservoir
Geology and Exploitation Engineering,
Southwest Petroleum University,
Chengdu, 610500 Sichuan, China
e-mail: swpuzhhq@126.com

Ying-chuan Li

State Key Laboratory of Oil and Gas Reservoir
Geology and Exploitation Engineering,
Southwest Petroleum University,
Chengdu, 610500 Sichuan, China
e-mail: swpilyc@hotmail.com

Contributed by the Petroleum Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received June 10, 2013; final manuscript received December 29, 2013; published online March 4, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Hong-Quan (Holden) Zhang.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 136(3), 032902 (Mar 04, 2014) (8 pages) Paper No: JERT-13-1176; doi: 10.1115/1.4026461 History: Received June 10, 2013; Revised December 29, 2013

An abnormal phenomenon may occur during gas-well testing: the wellhead pressure initially rises and then drops when shutting-in a well; the wellhead pressure initially drops and then rises when opening a well. To determine why and how this phenomenon occurs, a transient nonisothermal wellbore flow model for gas-well testing is developed. Governing equations are based on depth- and time-dependent mass, momentum equations, and the gas state equation. Temperature is predicted using the unsteady-state heat transfer model of Hasan. Boundary conditions include the restriction of formation inflow and wellhead throttling to the flow. The difference equations are established based on the implicit central finite difference method. The model can simulate the influences of temperature and flux (mass velocity). The model also considers the effects of formation inflow and surface throttling on the system. The results indicate wellhead pressure under flowing temperature is higher than that under static temperature, thus causing the abnormal phenomenon. A larger pressure difference makes the abnormal phenomenon more significant. Without considering temperature variation, simulated wellhead pressure would not exhibit the abnormity. Without considering flux variation, simulated pressure curve is not smooth. A new model has thus been validated using a gas field example.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Measured pressure build-up curve of one gas well [3]

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Fig. 2

Implicit central finite difference grids

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Fig. 3

Measured pressure and temperature during gas-well testing

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Fig. 4

Simulation of the wellhead pressure for well opening and shutting-in with the flowing, static, and variational temperatures

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Fig. 5

Simulation of the bottom-hole pressure for the well opening and shutting-in processes with the flowing and static temperature

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Fig. 6

Simulation of the gas density for the well opening process with changing temperature

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Fig. 7

Simulation of the gas density for the well shutting-in process with changing temperature

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Fig. 8

Simulation of the wellhead pressure for the well opening and shutting-in processes under three assumed conditions

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Fig. 9

Simulation of the bottom-hole pressure for the well opening and shutting-in processes under three assumed conditions

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Fig. 10

Simulation results during the whole period of well opening and shutting-in

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