0
Research Papers: Fuel Combustion

Filter Cake Properties of Water-Based Drilling Fluids Under Static and Dynamic Conditions Using Computed Tomography Scan

[+] Author and Article Information
Salaheldin Elkatatny

Research Assistant
Texas A&M University,
College station, Texas 77843
e-mail: salaheldin.elkatatny@pe.tamu.edu

Mohamed Mahmoud

Assistant Professor
King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals,
Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia
e-mail: mmahmoud@kfupm.edu.sa

Hisham A. Nasr-El-Din

Professor
Texas A&M University,
College station, Texas 77843
e-mail: Hisham.nasreldin@pe.tamu.edu

Contributed by the Advanced Energy Systems Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Energy Resources Technology. Manuscript received July 5, 2012; final manuscript received January 15, 2013; published online May 27, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Sarma V. Pisupati.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 135(4), 042201 (May 27, 2013) (9 pages) Paper No: JERT-12-1157; doi: 10.1115/1.4023483 History: Received July 05, 2012; Revised January 15, 2013

Previous studies considered the water-based drilling fluid filter cake as homogenous, containing one layer with an average porosity and permeability. The filter cake was recently proved to be heterogeneous, containing two layers with different properties (thickness, porosity and permeability). Heterogeneity of the filter cake plays a key role in the design of chemical treatments needed to remove the filter cake. The objectives of this study are to describe filter cake buildup under static and dynamic conditions, determine change in the filter medium properties, and obtain the local filtration properties for each layer in the filter cake. A high pressure high temperature (HPHT) filter press was used to perform the filtration process at 225 °F and 300 psi. A CT (computed tomography) scanner was used to measure the thickness and porosity of the filter cake. The results obtained from the CT scan showed that under static conditions, the formation of filter cake changed from compression to buildup; while under dynamic conditions, the filter cake was formed under continuous buildup. The CT results explained the changes in the thickness and porosity of each layer of the filter cake with time. The CT scans showed the change in the properties of the ceramic disk, such as porosity and permeability, which affect the calculation of the filter cake permeability. The change of the properties of the filter medium was ignored in previous studies.

Copyright © 2013 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Experimental setups

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Cumulative filtrate volume as a function of square root of time under static conditions at 225 °F and 300 psi differential pressure

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Cumulative filtrate volume as a function of time under dynamic conditions at 225 °F, 300 psi differential pressure, and rotational speed of 200 rpm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

The CT scan for the filter cake after 5, 15, 25, and 30 min under static conditions at 225 °F using 10 μm ceramic disk and 69 pcf water-based drilling fluid. Continuous increase in the thickness of both layers after 5 min.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Change in the average porosity of the layer closer to rock surface and the layer closer to drilling fluid under static conditions at 225 °F and 300 psi differential pressure

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

The CT scan for the filter cake after 5, 15, 25, and 30 min under dynamic conditions

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Change in the average porosity of the layer closer to rock surface and the layer closer to drilling fluid under dynamic conditions at 225 °F, 300 psi differential pressure, and rotational speed of 200 rpm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Change in the thickness of the layer closer to drilling fluid, the layer closer to rock surface, and total thickness with time under static conditions at 225 °F and 300 psi differential pressure

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Change in the thickness of the layer closer to drilling fluid, the layer closer to rock surface, and total thickness with time under dynamic conditions at 225 °F, 300 psi differential pressure, and rotational speed of 200 rpm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

The reduction of the filtrate flow rate with time during 30 min of filtration

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Average permeability of the filter cake obtained by applying Li et al. method [23] under static and dynamic conditions

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Pressure drop across the layer closer to rock surface and the layer closer to drilling fluid under static conditions at 225 °F and 300 psi differential pressure

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

The permeability of the layer closer to rock surface and the layer closer to drilling fluid under static conditions at 225 °F and 300 psi differential pressure

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Pressure drop across the layer closer to rock surface and the layer closer to drilling fluid under dynamic conditions at 225 °F, 300 psi differential pressure, and rotational speed of 200 rpm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

The permeability of the layer closer to rock surface and the layer closer to drilling fluid under dynamic conditions at 225 °F, 300 psi differential pressure, and rotational speed of 200 rpm

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In