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Research Papers: Fuel Combustion

Simulation of Oxy–Fuel Combustion of Heavy Oil Fuel in a Model Furnace

[+] Author and Article Information
Rached Ben-Manosur

Assistant Professor
Mechanical Engineering Department,
King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals (KFUPM),
Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia
e-mail: rmansour@kfupm.edu.sa

Pervez Ahmed

KACST-Technology Innovation Center
on Carbon Capture and Sequestration,
King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals (KFUPM),
Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia
e-mail: pervezahmed@kfupm.edu.sa

M. A. Habib

Professor
Mechanical Engineering Department,
King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals (KFUPM),
Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia
e-mail: mahabib@kfupm.edu.sa

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Advanced Energy Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received August 21, 2014; final manuscript received October 23, 2014; published online November 17, 2014. Editor: Hameed Metghalchi.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 137(3), 032206 (May 01, 2015) (12 pages) Paper No: JERT-14-1266; doi: 10.1115/1.4029007 History: Received August 21, 2014; Revised October 23, 2014; Online November 17, 2014

The present study aims at investigating the characteristics of oxy-combustion of heavy oil liquid fuel in a down-fired model furnace. Nonpremixed probability density function (PDF) mixture model was used to simulate the combustion characteristics and turbulence chemistry. The validation of the present model was performed against the experimental data and is found to be in good agreement. The results depict that the oxy-combustion of liquid fuels results in lower soot. It is observed that the soot formation is reduced when N2 in air-combustion is replaced by O2 in oxy-combustion. However, it increases as the amount of oxygen in oxy-combustion increases. Replacing nitrogen in the air-combustion by carbon dioxide in oxyfuel combustion tends to reduce the temperature levels in the upstream sections of the combustion chamber.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Line diagram of the model furnace in the present study

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Fig. 2

Comparison of present calculations and experimental data [17]

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Fig. 3

Contour of velocity (m/s) vector for oxy–fuel combustion of heavy oil fuel

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Fig. 4

Contour of turbulent intensity (%) for oxy-combustion of heavy oil fuel

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Fig. 5

The instantaneous view of the droplet diameter (m) distribution inside the furnace

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Fig. 6

Contours of Evaporation of heavy oil fuel droplet diameter (m) in oxy–fuel combustion

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Fig. 7

(a) Velocity and (b) temperature contours for oxy-heavy oil fuel combustion

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Fig. 8

Temperature contours of air and oxy–fuel combustion

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Fig. 9

Radial velocity distributions at two axial locations (a) X = 20 mm, (b) X = 600 mm for air and oxy–fuel combustion

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Fig. 10

Axial distributions of (a) density, (b) turbulent viscosity, and (c) specific heat for air and oxy–fuel combustion

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Fig. 11

Axial distributions of (a) temperature and (b) turbulent intensity for air and oxy–fuel combustion

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Fig. 12

Axial distributions of species concentrations of (a) CO, (b) CO2, (c) H2S, (d) S, (e) O2 for air- and oxy–fuel combustion

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Fig. 13

Contours of species concentrations of (a) O2, (b) CO2, (c) CO, and (d) soot for air combustion

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Fig. 14

Contours of soot concentrations for air- and oxy–fuel combustion

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Fig. 15

Contours of CO concentrations for air- and oxy–fuel combustion

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Fig. 16

Radial distributions of evaporation rate for air- and oxy–fuel combustion at different axial locations (a) X = 20 mm, (b) X = 300 mm from the inlet

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