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Research Papers: Petroleum Engineering

Friction, Contact Pressure, and Nonlinear Behavior of Steel Tubes in Subsea Umbilicals

[+] Author and Article Information
Farzan Parsinejad, Chris Kassner

Chevron Energy Technology Company,
Houston, TX 77002

Mark Kurtz

Chevron Upstream and Gas,
Houston, TX 77002

Naiquan Ye

MARINTEK,
Trondheim NO-7450, Norway

Contributed by the Petroleum Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received April 7, 2014; final manuscript received June 9, 2014; published online December 30, 2014. Editor: Hameed Metghalchi.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 137(3), 032906 (May 01, 2015) (7 pages) Paper No: JERT-14-1099; doi: 10.1115/1.4029384 History: Received April 07, 2014; Revised June 09, 2014; Online December 30, 2014

This paper focuses on evaluating the impact of friction and contact pressure on helical steel tubes. The initial gaps between steel tubes and adjacent layers, friction coefficients and the contact stiffness are the main factors that affect such investigation. A novel methodology by using UFLEX2D (a MARINTEK product) has been applied for modeling complex umbilical cross sections and for the study of these parameters. Two cross sections for the same subsea application but with different designs have been investigated in the study. It has been shown how fatigue damage can be significantly impacted by different cross-sectional design. For this study, nonlinear moment/curvature relationship has been included in the analyses. Based on the findings of this study, more realistic results can be achieved by including the nonlinear behavior in global analysis for fatigue damage calculations instead of using nominal bending stiffness supplied by umbilical manufacturer.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Illustration of model 1 (left) and model 2 (right)

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Fig. 2

Axial stiffness for models 1 and 2

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Fig. 3

Angular rotation caused by axial tension

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Fig. 4

Torsional moment caused by axial tension

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Fig. 5

Torsional stiffness for models 1 and 2

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Fig. 6

Bending stiffness for models 1 and 2

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Fig. 7

Stress hysteresis for steel tube

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Fig. 8

Typical stress curvature relation for steel tubes

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Fig. 9

Fatigue design curve for tubes in models 1 and 2

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Fig. 10

Distribution of curvature and cycles

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Fig. 11

Distribution of curvature and cycles, zoomed in

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Fig. 12

Distribution of damage versus curvature

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Fig. 13

Accumulated damage against curvature

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Fig. 14

Sensitivity of stress hysteresis to friction coefficient for model 1

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Fig. 15

Sensitivity of stress hysteresis to friction coefficient for model 2

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Fig. 16

Sensitivity of friction coefficient on friction stress

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Fig. 17

Sensitivity of lay angle of tensile armors for model 1

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