0
Research Papers: Petroleum Engineering

The Effects of Anisotropic Transport Coefficients on Pore Pressure in Shale Formations

[+] Author and Article Information
Vahid Dokhani

McDougall School of Petroleum Engineering,
University of Tulsa,
2450 E. Marshall Street,
Tulsa, OK 74110
e-mail: vahid-dokhani@utulsa.edu

Mengjiao Yu

McDougall School of Petroleum Engineering,
University of Tulsa,
2450 E. Marshall Street,
Tulsa, OK 74110
e-mail: mengjiao-yu@utulsa.edu

Stefan Z. Miska

McDougall School of Petroleum Engineering,
University of Tulsa,
2450 E. Marshall Street,
Tulsa, OK 74110
e-mail: stefan-miska@utulsa.edu

James Bloys

Chevron Corporation,
1400 Smith Street,
Houston, TX 77002
e-mail: ben.bloys@chevron.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Petroleum Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received October 7, 2013; final manuscript received December 8, 2014; published online December 30, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Arash Dahi Taleghani.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 137(3), 032905 (May 01, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: JERT-13-1288; doi: 10.1115/1.4029411 History: Received October 07, 2013; Revised December 08, 2014; Online December 30, 2014

This study investigates shale–fluid interactions through experimental approaches under simulated in situ conditions to determine the effects of bedding plane orientation on fluid flow through shale. Current wellbore stability models are developed based on isotropic conditions, where fluid transport coefficients are only considered in the radial direction. This paper also presents a novel mathematical method, which takes into account the three-dimensional coupled flow of water and solutes due to hydraulic, chemical, and electrical potential imposed by the drilling fluid and/or the shale formation. Numerical results indicate that the presence of microfissures can change the pore pressure distribution significantly around the wellbore and thus directly affect the mechanical strength of the shale.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2015 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Lyons, K. D., Honeygan, S., and Mroz, T., 2008, “NETL Extreme Drilling Laboratory Studies High Pressure High Temperature Drilling Phenomena,” ASME J. Energy Resour. Technol., 130(4), p. 043102. [CrossRef]
Hamayun, R., 2011, “Remote Workflows Put Digital Resources to Work to Reduce NPT,” Drill. Contract., 67(2). Available at: http://www.drillingcontractor.org/remote-workflows-put-digital-resources-to-work-to-reduce-npt-8783
Reid, P. I., and Minton, R. C., 1992, “New Water-Based Muds for Tertiary Shale Control,” SPE Drill. Eng., 7(4), pp. 237–240. [CrossRef]
Clark, D. E., and Saddok, Benaissa., 1993, “Aluminum Chemistry Provides Increased Shale Stability With Environmental Acceptability,” SPE Asia Pacific Oil and Gas Conference, February 8–10, Singapore, China. [CrossRef]
Patel, A. D., 2009, “Design and Development of Quaternary Amine Compounds: Shale Inhibition With Improved Environmental Profile,” SPE International Symposium on Oil Field Chemistry, April 20–22, The Woodlands, Texas. [CrossRef]
Nasiri, M., Ashrafizadeh, S. N., and Ghalambor, A., 2009, “Synthesis of a Novel Ester-based Drilling Fluid Applicable to High Temperature Conditions,” ASME J. Energy Resour. Technol., 131(1), p. 013103. [CrossRef]
Taner, S., Chenevert, M. E., and Sharma, M., 2009, “Minimizing Water Invasion in Shales Using Nanoparticles,” SPE Annual Technical Conference, October 4–7, New Orleans, LA. [CrossRef]
Abdo, J., and Haneef, M. D., 2012, “Nano-Enhanced Drilling Fluids: Pioneering Approach to Overcome Uncompromising Drilling Problems,” ASME J. Energy Resour. Technol., 134(1), p. 014501. [CrossRef]
Chenevert, M., 1970, “Shale Alteration by Water Adsorption,” J. Pet. Technol., 22(9), pp. 1141–1148. [CrossRef]
Ewy, R. T., and Stankovich, R. J., 2002, “Shale-Fluid Interactions Measured Under Simulated Downhole Conditions,” SPE/ISRM Rock Mechanics Conference, October 20–23, Irving, TX. [CrossRef]
Fjær, E., Holt, R. M., Nes, O.-M., and Sønstebø, E. F., 2002, “Mud Chemistry Effects on Time-Delayed Borehole Stability Problems in Shales,” SPE/ISRM, October 20–23 Irving, TX. [CrossRef]
Van Oort, E., Hale, A. H., Mody, F. K., and Roy, S., 1996, “Transport in Shales and the Design of Improved Water-Based Shale Drilling Fluids,” SPE Drill. Completion, 11(3), pp. 137–146. [CrossRef]
Lomba, R. F. T., Chenevert, M. E., and Sharma, M. M., 2000, “The Role of Osmotic Effects in Fluid Flow Through Shales,” J. Pet. Sci. Eng., 25(1), pp. 25–35. [CrossRef]
Yu, M., Chenevert, M. E., and Sharma, M. M., 2003, “Chemical–Mechanical Wellbore Instability Model for Shales: Accounting for Solute Diffusion,” J. Pet. Sci. Eng., 38(3), pp. 131–143. [CrossRef]
Lu, H., Yu, M., Miska, S., Takach, N., and Bloys, J., 2011, “Modeling Chemically Induced Pore Pressure Alterations in Near Wellbore Region of Shale Formations,” SPE Eastern Regional Meeting, August 17–19, Columbus, OH. [CrossRef]
Rahman, M. K., Zhixi, C., and Rahman, S. S., 2003, “Modeling Time-Dependent Pore Pressure Due to Capillary and Chemical Potential Effects and Resulting Wellbore Stability in Shales,” ASME J. Energy Resour. Technol., 125(3), pp. 169–176. [CrossRef]
Nes, O.-M., Fjaer, E., Tronvoll, J., Kristiansen, T. G., and Horsrud, P., 2012, “Drilling Time Reduction Through an Integrated Rock Mechanics Analysis,” ASME J. Energy Resour. Technol., 134(3), p. 032802. [CrossRef]
Nguyen, V., and Abousleiman, Y., 2010, “Real-Time Wellbore-Drilling Instability in Naturally Fractured Rock Formations With Field Applications,” IADC/SPE Asia Pacific Drilling Technology Conference, November 1–3, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. [CrossRef]
Edwards, S., Matsutsuyu, B., and Willson, S., 2004, “Imaging Unstable Wellbores While Drilling,” SPE Drill. Completion, 19(4), pp. 236–243. [CrossRef]
Wu, B., and Tan, C. P., 2010, “Effect of Shale Bedding Plane Failure on Wellbore Stability-Example From Analyzing Stuck-Pipe Wells,” Proceedings of the 44th U.S. Rock Mechanics Symposium and 5th US-Canada Rock Mechanics Symposium, June 27–30, Salt Lake City, UT.
Okland, D., and Cook, J. M., 1998, “Bedding-Related Borehole Instability in High-Angle Wells,” SPE/ISRM Rock Mechanics in Petroleum Engineering, pp. July 8–10, Trondheim, Norway. [CrossRef]
Nguyen, V., and Abousleiman, Y., 2009, “Naturally Fractured Reservoir Three-Dimensional Analytical Modeling: Theory and Case Study,” SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition, October 4–7, New Orleans, LA. [CrossRef]
Nguyen, V., Abousleiman, Y., and Hemphill, T., 2009, “Geomechanical Coupled Poromechanics Solutions While Drilling in Naturally Fractured Shale Formations With Field Case Applications,” SPE Annual Technical Conference, October 4–7, New Orleans, LA. [CrossRef]
Holder, J., Koelsch, T., Fruth, L., and Donath, F., 1998, “Laboratory Measurement of Permeability in Rock,” Proceedings of the 29th U.S. Symposium on Rock Mechanics (USRMS), June 13–15, Minneapolis, MN.
Yu, M., 2002, “Chemical and Thermal Effects on Wellbore Stability of Shale Formations,” Ph.D. dissertation, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX.
Sinha, S., Braun, E. M., Passey, Q. R., Leonardi, S. A., Wood, A. C., III, Zirkle, T., Boros, J. A., and Kudva, R. A., 2012, “Advances in Measurement Standards and Flow Properties Measurements for Tight Rocks Such as Shales,” Proceedings of the SPE/EAGE European Unconventional Resources Conference and Exhibition-From Potential to Production. Available at: http://www.earthdoc.org/publication/publicationdetails/?publication=58168.
Lakshminarayanaiah, N., 1969, Transport Phenomena in Membranes, Academic Press, New York.
Dokhani, V., 2005, “Modeling of Chemically Induced Transient Pore Pressure in Shale Formations,” M.Sc. thesis, University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK.

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Schematic of experimental setup of SFITC

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Comparison of the experimental results of Mancos shale sample (1SP) exposed to water with the model prediction

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Surface texture of Mancos shale sample (SN) before (a) and after (b) exposure to distilled water

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Comparison of the experimental results of Mancos shale sample (SN) exposed to distilled water with the model prediction

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Surface texture of Mancos shale sample (1SP) before (a) and after (b) exposure to distilled water

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Pore pressure prediction at 1.01 Rw for different fracture to matrix hydraulic coefficient ratios after 24 hr of exposure using time-independent coefficients

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Schematic of the discontinuous rock model, shale matrix is located between two parallel fracture planes

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Comparison of transport coefficients versus time as a function of bedding plane orientation derived from curve fitting results

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Pore pressure prediction versus depth at 1.01 Rw and 1.1 Rw for different models after 24 hr of shale exposure to drilling fluid

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Pore pressure profile versus depth at 1.01 Rw for different osmotic to hydraulic coefficient ratios after 24 hr of fluid exposure using time independent coefficients

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Pore pressure distribution around the wellbore as a function of depth after 24 hr exposure to drilling fluid for a horizontal shale layer

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Pore pressure distribution as a function of depth around the wellbore after 24 hr exposure to drilling fluid for an inclined shale layer

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In