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Research Papers: Petroleum Engineering

The Effects of Anisotropic Transport Coefficients on Pore Pressure in Shale Formations

[+] Author and Article Information
Vahid Dokhani

McDougall School of Petroleum Engineering,
University of Tulsa,
2450 E. Marshall Street,
Tulsa, OK 74110
e-mail: vahid-dokhani@utulsa.edu

Mengjiao Yu

McDougall School of Petroleum Engineering,
University of Tulsa,
2450 E. Marshall Street,
Tulsa, OK 74110
e-mail: mengjiao-yu@utulsa.edu

Stefan Z. Miska

McDougall School of Petroleum Engineering,
University of Tulsa,
2450 E. Marshall Street,
Tulsa, OK 74110
e-mail: stefan-miska@utulsa.edu

James Bloys

Chevron Corporation,
1400 Smith Street,
Houston, TX 77002
e-mail: ben.bloys@chevron.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Petroleum Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received October 7, 2013; final manuscript received December 8, 2014; published online December 30, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Arash Dahi Taleghani.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 137(3), 032905 (May 01, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: JERT-13-1288; doi: 10.1115/1.4029411 History: Received October 07, 2013; Revised December 08, 2014; Online December 30, 2014

This study investigates shale–fluid interactions through experimental approaches under simulated in situ conditions to determine the effects of bedding plane orientation on fluid flow through shale. Current wellbore stability models are developed based on isotropic conditions, where fluid transport coefficients are only considered in the radial direction. This paper also presents a novel mathematical method, which takes into account the three-dimensional coupled flow of water and solutes due to hydraulic, chemical, and electrical potential imposed by the drilling fluid and/or the shale formation. Numerical results indicate that the presence of microfissures can change the pore pressure distribution significantly around the wellbore and thus directly affect the mechanical strength of the shale.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of experimental setup of SFITC

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Fig. 2

Comparison of the experimental results of Mancos shale sample (1SP) exposed to water with the model prediction

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Fig. 3

Surface texture of Mancos shale sample (1SP) before (a) and after (b) exposure to distilled water

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Fig. 4

Comparison of the experimental results of Mancos shale sample (SN) exposed to distilled water with the model prediction

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Fig. 5

Surface texture of Mancos shale sample (SN) before (a) and after (b) exposure to distilled water

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Fig. 6

Comparison of transport coefficients versus time as a function of bedding plane orientation derived from curve fitting results

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Fig. 7

Schematic of the discontinuous rock model, shale matrix is located between two parallel fracture planes

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Fig. 8

Pore pressure prediction versus depth at 1.01 Rw and 1.1 Rw for different models after 24 hr of shale exposure to drilling fluid

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Fig. 9

Pore pressure prediction at 1.01 Rw for different fracture to matrix hydraulic coefficient ratios after 24 hr of exposure using time-independent coefficients

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Fig. 10

Pore pressure profile versus depth at 1.01 Rw for different osmotic to hydraulic coefficient ratios after 24 hr of fluid exposure using time independent coefficients

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Fig. 11

Pore pressure distribution around the wellbore as a function of depth after 24 hr exposure to drilling fluid for a horizontal shale layer

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Fig. 12

Pore pressure distribution as a function of depth around the wellbore after 24 hr exposure to drilling fluid for an inclined shale layer

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