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Research Papers: Fuel Combustion

Effect of Biodiesel on Biofilm Biodeterioration of Linear Low Density Polyethylene in a Simulated Fuel Storage Tank

[+] Author and Article Information
Juan-Manuel Restrepo-Flórez

Faculty of Engineering
Department of Chemical and
Biochemical Engineering,
University of Western Ontario,
1165 Richmond Street,
London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada
e-mail: jrestre7@uwo.ca

Jeffery A. Wood

Faculty of Engineering
Department of Chemical and
Biochemical Engineering,
University of Western Ontario,
1165 Richmond Street,
London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada
e-mail: jeffery.alan.wood@gmail.com

Lars Rehmann

Faculty of Engineering
Department of Chemical and
Biochemical Engineering,
University of Western Ontario,
1165 Richmond Street,
London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada
e-mail: lrehmann@uwo.ca

Michael Thompson

Faculty of Engineering
Department of Chemical
Engineering,
McMaster University,
280 Main Street West,
Hamilton, ON L8S 4L7, Canada
e-mail: mthomps@mcmaster.ca

Amarjeet Bassi

Faculty of Engineering
Department of Chemical and
Biochemical Engineering,
University of Western Ontario,
1165 Richmond Street,
London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada
e-mail: abassi@uwo.ca

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Internal Combustion Engine Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received February 19, 2014; final manuscript received March 16, 2015; published online April 2, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Stephen A. Ciatti.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 137(3), 032211 (May 01, 2015) (6 pages) Paper No: JERT-14-1057; doi: 10.1115/1.4030107 History: Received February 19, 2014; Revised March 16, 2015; Online April 02, 2015

A simulated fuel storage tank was used to study biodeterioration of linear low-density polyethylene over 100 days. The system consisted of a water layer inoculated with microorganisms and a fuel layer of diesel/biodiesel. Biodeterioration was characterized measuring: biofilm growth, surface chemistry, crystallinity, and topography. Results showed greater accumulation of biofilm at higher biodiesel concentrations. Polyethylene biodegradation measured as consumption of oxidized species, increase in contact angle with water and reduction in electron donor groups was observed in all samples and was slightly higher in biodiesel-rich fuels. Topography changes and weight loss showed that microbial penetration in the polymer was superficial.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Experimental setup used in this study. Three phases are observed: a fuel phase, a water layer with microorganisms and the polymer slab of LLDPE.

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Fig. 2

Biofilm growth on polyethylene surfaces at various biodiesel–diesel rations over 100 days of incubation

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Fig. 3

Keto-carbonyl index of polyethylene samples aged in fuels with different biodiesel content up to 100 days

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Fig. 4

Contact angle value with water on polyethylene surfaces aged in fuels with different biodiesel content up to 100 days

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Fig. 5

(a) Control, (b) and (c) SEM images of biofilms growing on polyethylene, bacteria penetrating the surface of the polymer are indicated by arrows

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Fig. 6

Change in basic component (electron donors) of the surface free energy calculated by using Young–Dupré equation for polyethylene samples aged in fuels with different biodiesel content up to 100 days

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