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Research Papers: Fuel Combustion

Natural Gas for High Load Dual-Fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition in Heavy-Duty Engines

[+] Author and Article Information
N. Ryan Walker

Engine Research Center,
University of Wisconsin–Madison,
1500 Engineering Drive,
Madison, WI 53706
e-mail: nwalker2@wisc.edu

Martin L. Wissink

Engine Research Center,
University of Wisconsin–Madison,
1500 Engineering Drive,
Madison, WI 53706
e-mail: wissink@wisc.edu

Dan A. DelVescovo

Engine Research Center,
University of Wisconsin–Madison,
1500 Engineering Drive,
Madison, WI 53706
e-mail: delvescovo@wisc.edu

Rolf D. Reitz

Engine Research Center,
University of Wisconsin–Madison,
1500 Engineering Drive,
Madison, WI 53706
e-mail: reitz@engr.wisc.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Internal Combustion Engine Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received January 22, 2015; final manuscript received February 19, 2015; published online March 31, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Stephen A. Ciatti.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 137(4), 042202 (Jul 01, 2015) (7 pages) Paper No: JERT-15-1031; doi: 10.1115/1.4030110 History: Received January 22, 2015; Revised February 19, 2015; Online March 31, 2015

Reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) has been shown to be capable of providing improved engine efficiencies coupled with the benefit of low emissions via in-cylinder fuel blending. Much of the previous body of work has studied the use of gasoline as the premixed low-reactivity fuel. However, there is interest in exploring the use of alternative fuels in advanced combustion strategies. Due to the strong market growth of natural gas as a fuel in both mobile and stationary applications, a study on the use of methane for RCCI combustion was performed. Single cylinder heavy-duty engine experiments were undertaken to examine the operating range of the RCCI combustion strategy with methane/diesel fueling and were compared against gasoline/diesel RCCI operation. The experimental results show a significant load extension of RCCI engine operation with methane/diesel fueling compared to gasoline/diesel fueling. For gasoline/diesel fueling, a maximum load of 6.9 bar gross indicated mean effective pressure (IMEPg) at CA50 = 0 deg aTDC (after top dead center) and 7.0 bar IMEPg at CA50 = 4 deg aTDC was obtained without use of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). For methane/diesel fueling, a maximum load of 15.4 bar IMEPg at CA50 = 0 deg aTDC and 17.3 bar IMEPg at CA50 = 4 deg aTDC was achieved, showing the effectiveness of the use of methane in extending the load limit for RCCI engine operation.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Ignition delay as a function of temperature for PRF0, PRF100, and CH4, at Φ = 0.3 and P = 40 bar

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Fig. 2

Diagram of Caterpillar SCOTE Laboratory layout

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Fig. 3

DI SOI timings as a function of engine load. Earlier injection timings are required for gasoline/diesel operation relative to methane/diesel operation.

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Fig. 4

Intake pressures for experimental conditions presented in this study

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Fig. 5

AHRRs for gasoline/diesel RCCI operation with CA50 = 0 deg aTDC combustion phasing

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Fig. 6

AHRRs for gasoline/diesel RCCI operation with CA50 = 4 deg aTDC combustion phasing

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Fig. 7

AHRRs for methane/diesel RCCI operation with CA50 = 0 deg aTDC combustion phasing

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Fig. 8

AHRRs for methane/diesel RCCI operation with CA50 = 4 deg aTDC combustion phasing

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Fig. 9

COV of IMEP. Methane/diesel operation has lower COV of IMEP relative to gasoline/diesel operation.

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Fig. 10

COV of PPRR. Methane/diesel operation has lower COV of PPRR relative to gasoline/diesel operation.

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Fig. 11

Peak cylinder pressure as a function of engine load. Both methane/diesel operation and delayed CA50 have lower peak cylinder pressure relative to gasoline/diesel operation and advanced CA50.

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Fig. 12

PPRR as a function of engine load. Both methane/diesel operation and delayed CA50 have lower PPRR relative to gasoline/diesel operation and advanced CA50.

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