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Technical Brief

Particulate Emissions From Karanja Biodiesel Fueled Turbocharged CRDI Sports Utility Vehicle Engine

[+] Author and Article Information
Jai Gopal Gupta

Engine Research Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur,
Kanpur 208016, India
e-mail: jaig@iitk.ac.in

Avinash Kumar Agarwal

Engine Research Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur,
Kanpur 208016, India
e-mail: akag@iitk.ac.in

Suresh K. Aggarwal

The Flow and Combustion Simulation Laboratory
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering,
University of Illinois at Chicago,
Chicago, IL 60607
e-mail: ska@uic.edu

Contributed by the Internal Combustion Engine Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received March 5, 2015; final manuscript received July 3, 2015; published online July 23, 2015. Editor: Hameed Metghalchi.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 137(6), 064503 (Jul 23, 2015) (6 pages) Paper No: JERT-15-1100; doi: 10.1115/1.4031006 History: Received March 05, 2015

Biodiesel has emerged as one of the most promising alternative fuel to mineral diesel in last two decades globally. Lower blends of biodiesel emit fewer pollutants, while easing pressure on scarce petroleum resources, without sacrificing engine power output and fuel economy. However, diesel engines emit significant amount of particulate matter (PM), most of which are nanoparticles. Due to the adverse health impact of PM emitted by compression ignition (CI) engines; most recent emission legislations restrict the total number of particles emitted, in addition to PM mass emissions. Use of biodiesel leads to reduction in PM mass emissions; however, the particle size–numbers distribution has not been investigated thoroughly. In this paper, PM emission characteristics from Karanja biodiesel blends (KB20 and KB40) in a modern common rail direct injection (CRDI) engine used in a sports utility vehicle (SUV) with a maximum fuel injection pressure of 1600 bar have been reported. This study also explored comparative effect of varying engine speeds and loads on particulate size–number distribution, particle size–surface area distribution, and total particulate number concentration from biodiesel blends vis-à-vis baseline mineral diesel. This study showed that particulate number emissions from Karanja biodiesel blends were relatively higher than baseline mineral diesel.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of the experimental setup

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Fig. 2

Particulate size–number distribution for Karanja biodiesel blends at varying engine loads, 2000 rpm

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Fig. 3

Particulate size–number distribution for Karanja biodiesel blends at varying engine speeds, rated load

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Fig. 4

Particulate size–surface area distribution for Karanja biodiesel blends at varying engine loads, 2000 rpm

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Fig. 5

Particulate size–surface area distribution for Karanja biodiesel blends at varying engine speeds, rated load

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Fig. 6

Total particulate number variations with load for Karanja biodiesel blends at varying engine speeds

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