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Research Papers: Fuel Combustion

Systematic Selection and Siting of Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure to Synergistically Meet Future Demands for Alternative Fuels

[+] Author and Article Information
Peter J. Willette, Brendan Shaffer, G. Scott Samuelsen

Advanced Power and Energy Program,
University of California,
Irvine, CA 92697-3550

Contributed by the Internal Combustion Engine Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received July 15, 2014; final manuscript received July 7, 2015; published online August 3, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Avinash Kumar Agarwal.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 137(6), 062204 (Aug 03, 2015) (9 pages) Paper No: JERT-14-1218; doi: 10.1115/1.4031041 History: Received July 15, 2014

In order to meet the increasing demand for low carbon and renewable transportation fuels, a methodology for systematically establishing build-out scenarios is desirable. In an effort to minimize initial investment costs associated with the development of fueling infrastructure, the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) has been developed and applied, as an illustration, to the case of hydrogen fueling infrastructure deployment in the State of California. In this study, five parameters are selected in order to rank hydrogen transportation fuel generation locations within the State. In order to utilize meaningful weighting factors within the AHP, expert inputs were gathered and employed in the exercising of the models suite of weighting parameters. The analysis uses statewide geographic information and identifies both key energy infrastructure expansion locations and critical criteria that make the largest impact in the location of selected sites.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Candidate fuel generation locations

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Fig. 2

General AHP hierarchy

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Fig. 3

Spatial AHP decision-making process

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Fig. 4

Candidate generation location rankings for the entire state of California

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Fig. 5

SoCAB AHP priority rankings for fuel generation locations and infrastructure map [24]

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Fig. 6

Detailed view of cities in the SoCAB area of study

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Fig. 7

SoCAB AHP priority rankings for fuel generation locations and power plants map [24]

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Fig. 8

SoCAB average five nearest population points from landscan data relative to candidate fuel generation locations

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Fig. 9

SoCAB Zillow™ real estate data correlated to candidate fueling locations

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Fig. 10

Zillow™ raw real estate data for cities in the SoCAB

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Fig. 11

SFBAAB AHP priority rankings for fuel generation locations and infrastructure map [24]

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Fig. 12

Detailed view of cities in the SFBAAB

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Fig. 13

SFBAAB AHP priority rankings for fuel generation locations and power plants map [24]

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Fig. 14

SFBAAB average five nearest population points from landscan data relative to candidate fuel generation locations

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Fig. 15

Zillow™ raw real estate data for cities in the SFBAAB

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Fig. 16

SFBAAB Zillow real estate data correlated to candidate fueling locations

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