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Research Papers: Petroleum Engineering

The Effect of Viscosity on Low Concentration Particle Transport in Single-Phase (Liquid) Horizontal Pipes

[+] Author and Article Information
Kamyar Najmi

Mem. ASME
Mechanical Engineering Department,
The University of Tulsa,
800 South Tucker Drive,
Tulsa, OK 74104
e-mail: kamyar-najmi@utulsa.edu

Brenton S. McLaury

Mem. ASME
Mechanical Engineering Department,
The University of Tulsa,
800 South Tucker Drive,
Tulsa, OK 74104
e-mail: brenton-mclaury@utulsa.edu

Siamack A. Shirazi

Mem. ASME
Mechanical Engineering Department,
The University of Tulsa,
800 South Tucker Drive,
Tulsa, OK 74104
e-mail: siamack-shirazi@utulsa.edu

Selen Cremaschi

Department of Chemical Engineering,
The University of Tulsa,
800 South Tucker Drive,
Tulsa, OK 74104
e-mail: Selen-cremaschi@utulsa.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Petroleum Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received August 20, 2014; final manuscript received December 8, 2015; published online January 5, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Pirouz Kavehpour.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 138(3), 032902 (Jan 05, 2016) (11 pages) Paper No: JERT-14-1264; doi: 10.1115/1.4032227 History: Received August 20, 2014; Revised December 08, 2015

Particle transport has been an active area of research for many years. Despite many excellent experimental and modeling studies contributing to the fundamental understanding of particle transport, the effect of viscosity is still not well-understood. There are limited experimental studies addressing the effect of viscosity on particle transport. Even among those limited studies, contradictory conclusions have been reported in the literature. A review of the single-phase proposed models also reveals that fluid viscosity has not been well addressed in the models as well. The main focus of this study is to investigate the effect of viscosity on particle transport in laminar and turbulent flows. Experiments were performed using a 0.05 m diameter pipe. Comparisons of the obtained data with previously reported data in the literature show similar characteristics. The current study finds that liquid flow regime in the pipe plays an important role on how viscosity affects the particle transport phenomenon. Discussions presented in this work to explain the obtained experimental data shed light on this less addressed physical parameter.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Sand transport flow regimes

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Fig. 2

Schematic of experimental facility

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Fig. 3

Particle distribution (a) 300 μm silica sand, (b) 150 μm silica sand, (c) 20 μm silica sand, (d) 350 μm glass beads, and (e) 150 μm glass beads

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Fig. 4

Comparison of the shape of the particles used in current study; 300 μm nonspherical silica sand and 150 μm spherical glass beads

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Fig. 5

Shear stress-shear rate behavior of CMC solution of 70 cP viscosity

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Fig. 6

Comparison of previously reported data with current study carrier fluid: water, particle diameter: 150 μm, pipe diameter: 0.05 m

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Fig. 7

Comparison of previously reported data with current study carrier fluid: water, particle diameter: 150 μm, and pipe diameter: 0.05 m

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Fig. 8

Comparison of data obtained in current study with previously reported data in the literature, carrier fluid: water, and pipe diameter: 0.05 m

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Fig. 9

Particle size effect on critical velocity carrier fluid: water, particle type: sand, and pipe diameter: 0.05 m

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Fig. 10

Particle size effect on critical velocity carrier fluid: water, particle type: glass beads, and pipe diameter: 0.05 m

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Fig. 11

Particle shape effect on critical velocity carrier fluid: water, particle size: 150 μm, and pipe diameter: 0.05 m

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Fig. 12

Data available in the literature regarding the effect of viscosity carrier fluid: water and mentor oil, particle type: natural sediment, and pipe diameter: 0.138 m

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Fig. 13

Data available in the literature regarding the effect of viscosity carrier fluid: glycerin and water, particle type: sand, and pipe diameter: 0.032–0.057 m

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Fig. 14

Data available in the literature regarding the effect of viscosity carrier fluid: ethylene glycol, particle type: sand, particle diameter: 490 μm, and pipe diameter: 0.05 m

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Fig. 15

Carrier fluid viscosity effect on critical velocity carrier fluid: water + CMC, particle type: sand, particle size: 300 μm, and pipe diameter: 0.05 m

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Fig. 16

Carrier fluid viscosity effect on critical velocity carrier fluid: water + CMC, particle type: sand, particle size: 150 μm, and pipe diameter: 0.05 m

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Fig. 17

Carrier fluid viscosity effect on critical velocity carrier fluid: water + CMC, particle type: sand, particle size: 150 μm, and pipe diameter: 0.05 m

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Fig. 18

Comparison of the Oroskar and Turian [6] model with experimental data obtained in current study, pipe diameter: 0.05 m, carrier liquid: water, and carrier liquid viscosity: 1 cP

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