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Research Papers: Energy Storage/Systems

Performance Assessment of an Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage System for Heating and Cooling Applications

[+] Author and Article Information
Abdullah A. AlZahrani

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science,
University of Ontario Institute of Technology,
2000 Simcoe Street North,
Oshawa, ON L1H 7K4, Canada;
Mechanical Engineering Department,
Umm Al-Qura University,
P.O. Box 5555
Makkah, Saudi Arabia
e-mail: abdullah.alzahrani@uoit.ca

Ibrahim Dincer

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science,
University of Ontario Institute of Technology,
2000 Simcoe Street North,
Oshawa, ON L1H 7K4, Canada
e-mail: ibrahim.dincer@uoit.ca

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Advanced Energy Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received September 16, 2014; final manuscript received September 4, 2015; published online September 29, 2015. Editor: Hameed Metghalchi.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 138(1), 011901 (Sep 29, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: JERT-14-1298; doi: 10.1115/1.4031581 History: Received September 16, 2014; Revised September 04, 2015

This study presents energy and exergy analyses of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) integrated with a building heating and cooling system. In this regard, a typical bidirectional ATES integrated with a heat pump (HP) is considered in the provision of required heating and cooling demands. The different ATES components and the operating principle are described. Furthermore, energy and exergy models are formulated for three subprocesses: charging, storing, and discharging, to track changes in energy and exergy quantities with discharging time. The energetic and exergetic efficiencies are then evaluated for both operating cases. The limitation of the use of energy efficiency for ATES performance assessment is elaborated. In contrast, the importance of exergy analysis as a practical and temperature sensitive tool is considered as a quantitative and a qualitative measure of the ATES performance. Additionally, a comparison between energetic and exergetic efficiencies is presented where energy efficiency involves some ambiguities, especially when energy recovered from ATES is at a low temperature rather than at an ambient temperature.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic representations of ATES for both: (a) cooling mode and (b) heating mode

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Fig. 2

Average temperature data for Oshawa, ON, Canada [22]

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Fig. 3

Discharging temperature profile with time, reproduced based on the experimental data taken from Ref. [23]

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Fig. 4

Temperature profiles with discharging time in days for the heating mode

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Fig. 5

The changes in energy charged, energy loss, and energy discharged with discharging time for the heating operating mode

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Fig. 6

The changes in exergy charged, exergy loss, and exergy discharged with discharging time for heating operating mode

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Fig. 7

The changes in energy efficiencies over the discharging time for different levels of losses for the heating operating mode

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Fig. 8

The changes in exergy efficiencies over the discharging time for different levels of heat losses for the heating operating mode

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Fig. 9

Temperature profiles versus the discharging time for the cooling operating mode

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Fig. 10

The changes in energy charged, energy loss, and energy discharged with discharging time for the cooling operating mode

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Fig. 11

The changes in exergy charged, exergy loss, and exergy discharged with discharging time for the cooling operating mode

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Fig. 12

The changes in energy efficiencies over the discharging time for different levels of losses (heat gain) for the cooling operating mode

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Fig. 13

The changes in exergy efficiencies over the discharging time for different levels of heat losses for the cooling operating mode

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