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Research Papers: Petroleum Engineering

Evaluation of Rock Mechanical Properties Alteration During Matrix Stimulation With Chelating Agents

[+] Author and Article Information
Assad Barri

Department of Petroleum Engineering,
King Fahd University of
Petroleum and Minerals,
Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia
e-mails: assdbarri@kfupm.edu.sa;
assadbarri@hotmail.com

Mohamed Mahmoud

Department of Petroleum Engineering,
King Fahd University of
Petroleum and Minerals,
Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia
e-mails: mmahmoud@kfupm.edu.sa;
mohnasreldin80@gmail.com

Salaheldin Elkatatny

Department of Petroleum Engineering,
King Fahd University of
Petroleum and Minerals,
Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia
e-mail: elkatatny@kfupm.edu.sa

Contributed by the Petroleum Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received August 20, 2015; final manuscript received January 6, 2016; published online February 5, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Egidio Marotta.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 138(3), 032907 (Feb 05, 2016) (7 pages) Paper No: JERT-15-1315; doi: 10.1115/1.4032546 History: Received August 20, 2015; Revised January 06, 2016

Well stimulation using acidic solutions is widely used to treat carbonate formations. The acidic fluids remove the near-wellbore damage and create channels around the wellbore by dissolving fraction of the carbonate rocks. Many stimulation fluids have been used such as hydrochloric acid (HCl) acid, organic acids, and chelating agents to stimulate carbonate reservoirs. Wormholes that are created by these fluids are very effective and will yield negative skin values and this will enhance the well productivity. In addition to the wormhole creation, the diffusion of these fluids inside the pores of the rock may create significant and permanent changes in the rock mechanical properties. These changes can eventually lead to weakening the rock strength, which may lead to future formation damage due to the wellbore instability. In this paper, the effect of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) chelating agents on the carbonate rocks elastic properties was investigated. The effect of wormholes created by chelating agent on the rock mechanical properties was investigated. Computed tomography (CT) scan and acoustic measurements were conducted on the core samples before and after matrix stimulation treatments. Experimental results showed that the mechanical properties of strong rocks such as Indiana limestone (IL) cores were not affected when chelating agents were used to stimulate those cores. On the other hand, less strong rocks such as Austin chalk (AC) show significant alteration on the rock elastic properties when chelating agents were used as stimulation fluids.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of the core flooding setup

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Fig. 2

Wormhole propagation inside IL and AC core samples; IL#1 & AC#1 stimulated by EDTA, and IL#2 & AC#2 stimulated by DTPA

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Fig. 3

Effect of the chelating agent's volume injected on the compressional wave velocity

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Fig. 4

Effect of chelating agent's volume injected on the shear wave velocity

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Fig. 5

Effect of chelating agent's volume injected on the Young modulus

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Fig. 6

Effect of chelating agent's volume injected on the shear modulus

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Fig. 7

Effect of chelating agent's volume injected on the bulk modulus

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Fig. 8

Effect of chelating agent's volume injected on the Poisson's ratio

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