0
Research Papers: Fuel Combustion

Diesoline, Diesohol, and Diesosene Fuelled HCCI Engine Development

[+] Author and Article Information
Akhilendra Pratap Singh

Engine Research Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur,
Kanpur 208016, India
e-mail: akhips@iitk.ac.in

Avinash Kumar Agarwal

Engine Research Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur,
Kanpur 208016, India
e-mail: akag@iitk.ac.in

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Internal Combustion Engine Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received February 26, 2015; final manuscript received April 25, 2016; published online June 14, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Stephen A. Ciatti.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 138(5), 052212 (Jun 14, 2016) (13 pages) Paper No: JERT-15-1090; doi: 10.1115/1.4033571 History: Received February 26, 2015; Revised April 25, 2016

Compression ignition (CI) engines are facing strong restrictive emission norms globally, which demand extremely low oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions. Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine is a very attractive solution to meet these stringent emission challenges due to its capability to simultaneously reduce NOx and PM. In this study, HCCI combustion was investigated using different test fuels such as diesoline (15% v/v gasoline with diesel), diesohol (15% v/v ethanol with diesel), and diesosene (15% v/v kerosene with diesel) vis-a-vis baseline mineral diesel. A dedicated fuel vaporizer was used for homogeneous fuel–air mixture preparation. The experiments were performed at constant intake charge temperature (180 °C), fixed exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) (15%) at different engine loads. Stable combustion characteristics were determined for diesosene at lower engine loads, however, diesoline and diesohol yielded improved emissions compared to baseline diesel HCCI combustion. At higher loads, diesoline and diesosene showed higher knocking tendency compared to baseline diesel and diesohol. Diesohol showed lower NOx and smoke opacity, however, diesoline and diesosene showed slightly lower hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions compared to baseline diesel HCCI combustion. Performance results of diesohol and diesosene were slightly inferior compared to diesel and diesoline HCCI combustion. Physical characterization of exhaust particulates was done for these test fuels using engine exhaust particle sizer (EEPS). Particle number-size distribution showed that most particles emitted from diesoline and diesohol were in ultrafine size range and baseline diesel and diesosene emitted relatively larger particles. Reduction in total particle number concentration with addition of volatile fuel components in mineral diesel was another important observation of this study.

Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

HCCI experimental setup

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Schematic of the fuel vaporizer

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Schematic of fuel injection and DAQ system

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Volatility characteristics of test fuels

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Injector calibration curves for mineral diesel, diesohol, diesoline, and diesosene

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

In-cylinder pressure variation at different λ for constant intake air temperature and EGR

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

RoHR at different λ for constant intake air temperature and EGR

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Maximum in-cylinder pressure, maximum RoPR and position of maximum in-cylinder pressure at different relative fuel–air ratios for constant intake air temperature and EGR

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

SoC, 50% MFB and combustion duration at different relative fuel–air ratios for constant intake air temperature and EGR

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Knock integral, noise and knock peak at different relative fuel–air ratios for constant intake air temperature and EGR

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Performance parameters at different relative fuel–air ratios for constant intake air temperature and EGR

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Exhaust gas analysis at different λ for constant intake air temperature and EGR

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

(a) PAH emissions at different λ for constant intake air temperature and EGR and (b) percentage change in PAH emissions using different fuel blends w.r.t. baseline mineral diesel

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Particle number-size distribution at different λ for constant intake air temperature and EGR

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

Particle concentration at different λ for constant intake air temperature and EGR (a) total number concentration and (b) percentage contribution of nanoparticles and ultrafine particles in total number concentration of particles

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 16

Particle size-surface area distribution at different λ for constant intake air temperature and EGR

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 17

Particle size-mass distribution at different λ for constant intake air temperature and EGR

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 18

Particle mass distribution in nanorange and ultrafine range for different λ at constant intake air temperature and EGR

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In