0
Research Papers: Fuel Combustion

Experimental Study on In-Cylinder Pressure Oscillations of Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition–Direct Injection Combustion Engine Fueled With Dimethyl Ether

[+] Author and Article Information
Junxing Hou

School of Mechatronics Engineering,
Zhengzhou University of Aeronautics,
Zhengzhou 450015, China
e-mail: houjunxing@126.com

Jianwei Liu

School of Mechatronics Engineering,
Zhengzhou University of Aeronautics,
Zhengzhou 450015, China
e-mail: cnhnlyljw@163.com

Yongqiang Wei

School of Mechatronics Engineering,
Zhengzhou University of Aeronautics,
Zhengzhou 450015, China
e-mail: yqwei2008@163.com

Zhiqiang Jiang

School of Mechatronics Engineering,
Zhengzhou University of Aeronautics,
Zhengzhou 450015, China
e-mail: newroom@126.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Internal Combustion Engine Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received February 17, 2016; final manuscript received April 29, 2016; published online June 7, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Stephen A. Ciatti.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 138(5), 052211 (Jun 07, 2016) (8 pages) Paper No: JERT-16-1097; doi: 10.1115/1.4033588 History: Received February 17, 2016; Revised April 29, 2016

The in-cylinder pressure oscillations of a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI)-DI engine fueled with dimethyl ether (DME) have been investigated using discrete wavelet transform (DWT) based on four different wavelet functions. The in-cylinder pressure is decomposed into three levels that contain three details D1, D2, and D3, and an approximation A1. In normal combustion, there are no obvious pressure impacts in three details due to smooth combustion process. The abnormal pressure oscillations occur in three details in knocking combustion, and the oscillation is most intense in D1. Its frequency band 5–10 kHz is the knock frequency band, and most high-frequency pressure oscillations and wavelet energy are in this frequency band. The pressure oscillations are located in the premixed combustion stage and diffusion combustion stage. Characteristics of in-cylinder pressure oscillations can be extracted using four wavelet functions “db4,” “db8,” “sym4,” and “sym8.” Extract abilities of four wavelet functions are different and wavelet db4 is suitable for pressure oscillation detection.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

DME engine and the measurement apparatus

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Three-levels discrete wavelet decomposition (pressure = A3 + D3 + D2 + D1)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

In-cylinder pressure (a), PRR (b), and HRR (c) with normal combustion and knocking combustion at 1500 rpm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

In-cylinder pressure with normal combustion and knocking combustion at 1500 rpm (a) and at 1100 rpm (b)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Decompositions of in-cylinder pressure with normal combustion (a) and knocking combustion (b) at 1500 rpm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Decompositions of in-cylinder pressure with normal combustion (a) and knocking combustion (b) at 1100 rpm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Wavelet energy of in-cylinder pressure with normal combustion and knocking combustion at 1500 rpm (a) and 1100 rpm (b)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Decompositions of in-cylinder pressure using four wavelet functions with normal combustion (a) and knocking combustion (b)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Wavelet energy of in-cylinder pressure using four wavelet functions

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Correlation analysis between PRR and results using four wavelet functions with normal combustion (a) and knocking combustion (b)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Wavelet energy of in-cylinder pressure with normal combustion (a) and knocking combustion (b)

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In