0
Research Papers: Oil/Gas Reservoirs

Modeling of Hydraulic Fracture Propagation in Shale Gas Reservoirs: A Three-Dimensional, Two-Phase Model

[+] Author and Article Information
Chong Hyun Ahn

Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering,
Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering
and EMS Energy Institute,
The Pennsylvania State University,
3S Laboratory for Petroleum Research,
202 Hosler Building,
University Park, PA 16802
e-mail: cza5010@psu.edu

Robert Dilmore

U.S. Department of Energy,
National Energy Technology Laboratory,
626 Cochrans Mill Road,
P.O. Box 10940,
Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940
e-mail: robert.dilmore@netl.doe.gov

John Yilin Wang

Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering,
Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering
and EMS Energy Institute,
The Pennsylvania State University,
3S Laboratory for Petroleum Research,
202 Hosler Building,
University Park, PA 16802
e-mail: john.wang@psu.edu

Contributed by the Petroleum Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received January 1, 2016; final manuscript received May 21, 2016; published online June 27, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Egidio Marotta.This material is declared a work of the U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 139(1), 012903 (Jun 27, 2016) (13 pages) Paper No: JERT-16-1001; doi: 10.1115/1.4033856 History: Received January 01, 2016; Revised May 21, 2016

A three-dimensional, two-phase, dual-continuum hydraulic fracture (HF) propagation simulator was developed and implemented. This paper presents a detailed method for efficient and effective modeling of the fluid flow within fracture and matrix as well as fluid leakoff, fracture height growth, and the fracture network propagation. Both a method for solving the system of coupled equations, and a verification of the developed model are presented herein.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Visual representation of height growth model

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

(a) Length (ft) versus time (min) and (b) width (in.) versus time (min). The grid sizes of 0.1, 1, 10, and 100 ft are studied.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Schematic of gridding system in both fracture and matrix domain

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Fracture domain discretization along x-direction

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Schematic flowchart of the three-dimensional, two-phase numerical solution

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Comparison results showing favorable comparison between PKN and model developed herein for fracture height evolution through time (a), and fracture width versus time (b)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Visual representation of three-layer height growth model input values

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Height growth comparison result for seven-layer case. Solid lines indicate the result from the model developed herein while square symbols represent the results from the reference model.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Vertical stress profile for each layer

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Height comparison between the model developed herein and DFN. (Left: height versus network length from the model developed herein and the black and grey to white color bar indicates the width of a fracture in ft; right: height versus width of the fracture at the perforation (primary fracture) from DFN. The contour map shows the width of a primary fracture as length increases.)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Final fracture network comparison (top view). Top network is from Jacot's result and the bottom is from the model developed herein. The horizontal well is located along the zero in x-axis and perforation is placed at (0,0).

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Final fracture network characteristics (height, length, and aperture) from the model developed herein. This representation is for only half of a fracture network.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In