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Research Papers: Fuel Combustion

Theoretical Prediction of Laminar Burning Speed and Ignition Delay Time of Gas-to-Liquid Fuel

[+] Author and Article Information
Guangying Yu, Fatemeh Hadi, Ziyu Wang, Hameed Metghalchi

Mechanical and Industrial
Engineering Department,
Northeastern University,
Boston, MA 02115

Omid Askari

Mechanical Engineering Department,
Mississippi State University,
Starkville, MS 39762

Kumaran Kannaiyan, Reza Sadr

Mechanical Engineering Department,
Texas A&M University at Qatar,
P.O. Box 23874,
Doha, Qatar

Contributed by the Advanced Energy Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received June 8, 2016; final manuscript received June 14, 2016; published online July 12, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Arash Dahi Taleghani.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 139(2), 022202 (Jul 12, 2016) (6 pages) Paper No: JERT-16-1242; doi: 10.1115/1.4033984 History: Received June 08, 2016; Revised June 14, 2016

Gas-to-liquid (GTL), an alternative synthetic jet fuel derived from natural gas through Fischer–Tropsch (F–T) process, has gained significant attention due to its cleaner combustion characteristics when compared to conventional counterparts. The effect of chemical composition on key performance aspects such as ignition delay, laminar burning speed, and emission characteristics has been experimentally studied. However, the development of chemical mechanism to predict those parameters for GTL fuel is still in its early stage. The GTL aviation fuel from Syntroleum Corporation, S-8, is used in this study. For theoretical predictions, a mixture of 32% iso-octane, 25% n-decane, and 43% n-dodecane by volume is considered as the surrogate for S-8 fuel. In this work, a detailed kinetics model (DKM) has been developed based on the chemical mechanisms reported for the GTL fuel. The DKM is employed in a constant internal energy and constant volume reactor to predict the ignition delay times for GTL over a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and equivalence ratios. The ignition delay times predicted using DKM are validated with those reported in the literature. Furthermore, the steady one-dimensional premixed flame code from CANTERA is used in conjunction with the chemical mechanisms to predict the laminar burning speeds for GTL fuel over a wide range of operating conditions. Comparison of ignition delay and laminar burning speed shows that the Ranzi et al. mechanism has a better agreement with the available experimental data, and therefore is used for further evaluation in this study.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Comparison of ignition delay time between available GTL chemical mechanisms [33,34,36,43] and experimental data [23] at equivalence ratio of 1 and pressure of 20 atm for a wide range of temperatures

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Fig. 2

Comparison of laminar burning speed between GTL chemical mechanisms [33,36,43] and experimental data [22,28,30] for different equivalence ratios at pressure of 1 atm and temperature of 400 K

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Fig. 3

Comparison of laminar burning speed between GTL chemical mechanisms [33,36,43] and experimental data [22,28,29,38] for different equivalence ratios at pressure of 1 atm and temperature of 473 K

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Fig. 4

Theoretical ignition delay time for a wide range of pressures and temperatures using Ranzi et al. [43] mechanism for stoichiometric GTL/air mixture

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Fig. 5

Theoretical ignition delay time for a wide range of temperatures at three different equivalence ratios and a pressure of 10 atm using Ranzi et al. [43] mechanism for GTL/air mixture

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Fig. 6

Theoretical ignition delay time for a wide range of temperatures at three different equivalence ratios and a pressure of 50 atm using Ranzi et al. [43] mechanism for GTL/air mixture

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Fig. 7

Theoretical ignition delay time for a wide range of temperatures at three different equivalence ratios and a pressure of 100 atm using Ranzi et al. [43] mechanism for GTL/air mixture

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Fig. 8

Theoretical laminar burning speed and flame thickness for a wide range of equivalence ratios and different temperatures of 400, 500, 600, 700, and 800 K at pressure of 1 atm using Ranzi et al. [43] mechanism for GTL/air mixture

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Fig. 9

Theoretical laminar burning speed and flame thickness for a wide range of equivalence ratios and different pressures of 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 atm at temperature of 533 K using Ranzi et al. [43] mechanism for GTL/air mixture

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