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Research Papers: Energy Systems Analysis

Ash Fusibility Based on Modes of Occurrence and High-Temperature Behaviors of Mineral Matter in Coals

[+] Author and Article Information
Xinye Cheng

State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization,
Zhejiang University,
Hangzhou 310027, China
e-mail: 21427115@zju.edu.cn

Kexin Han

State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization,
Zhejiang University,
Hangzhou 310027, China
e-mail: 21327018@zju.edu.cn

Zhenyu Huang

State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization,
Zhejiang University,
Hangzhou 310027, China
e-mail: huangzy@zju.edu.cn

Zhihua Wang

State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization,
Zhejiang University,
Hangzhou 310027, China
e-mail: wangzh@zju.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Advanced Energy Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received April 21, 2016; final manuscript received July 14, 2016; published online August 17, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Yiannis Levendis.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 139(2), 022003 (Aug 17, 2016) (10 pages) Paper No: JERT-16-1183; doi: 10.1115/1.4034289 History: Received April 21, 2016; Revised July 14, 2016

Complete quantitative data of the chemical (proximate, ultimate, and ash analyses) and mineral (in low-temperature ash (LTA) and various high-temperature ashes (HTA)) compositions of 21 coals were used to investigate the modes of occurrences and high-temperature behaviors of the minerals in coals and their influence on ash fusibility. The common minerals present in the low-temperature ashes (LTA) are kaolinite, quartz, muscovite, calcite, gypsum, pyrite, and siderite. The samples were divided into two groups according to the hemispherical temperature for a comparative study of the behavior of mineral matters. Results show that the average number of mineral species (ANMS) and amorphous substances (AS) in the LTAs of the two groups are essentially the same. The ANMS in both the low and high (ash fusion temperatures, AFT) ash samples go through the same tendency of a slight reduction at first, an increase, and finally, a significant reduction. As the temperature increases, the ANMS in the low-AFT ash is initially higher and then lower than the high-AFT ash, whereas the tendency of the AS is quite the opposite. The ash melting process is divided into three stages, and the AFTs are related to different degrees of the eutectic stage.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) of chemical compositions and ash fusion temperatures (AFT)

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Fig. 2

Hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) of ash compositions

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Fig. 3

Comparison between crystalline Fe in low-temperature ash (LTA) and crystalline Fe in 815 °C treated ash (TA)

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Fig. 4

Comparison between gypsum CaSO4 in low-temperature ash (LTA) and anhydrite CaSO4 in 815 °C treated ash (TA)

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Fig. 5

Changes of average number of mineral species (ANMS) in low- and high-ash fusion temperatures (AFT) ashes at different temperatures

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Fig. 6

Changes of amorphous substance (AS) in low- and high-ash fusion temperatures (AFT) ashes at different temperatures

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Fig. 7

Changes of crystal and amorphous minerals in typical samples

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