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Research Papers: Energy Systems Analysis

A Parametrically Broadband Nonlinear Energy Harvester

[+] Author and Article Information
Tanju Yildirim, Thomas Searle, Gursel Alici

School of Mechanical, Materials, and
Mechatronics Engineering,
University of Wollongong,
Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia

Mergen H. Ghayesh

School of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Adelaide,
Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia
e-mail: mergen.ghayesh@adelaide.edu.au

Weihua Li

School of Mechanical, Materials, and
Mechatronics Engineering,
University of Wollongong,
Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
e-mail: weihuali@uow.edu.au

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Advanced Energy Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received February 6, 2016; final manuscript received July 20, 2016; published online October 10, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Antonio J. Bula.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 139(3), 032001 (Oct 10, 2016) (8 pages) Paper No: JERT-16-1076; doi: 10.1115/1.4034514 History: Received February 06, 2016; Revised July 20, 2016

In this work, for the first time, an energy harvester based on the nonlinear dynamical response of a parametrically excited cantilever beam in contact with mechanical stoppers has been fabricated and tested; a 145% increase in the bandwidth at which energy can be effectively harvested has been observed. Experimental and theoretical investigations have been performed in order to assess the increased operating bandwidth of the energy harvester fabricated; for the experimental investigations, an electrodynamic shaker connected to a shaking table has been used to parametrically stimulate the energy harvesting device. Results showed that the parametric energy harvester without stoppers displayed a weak softening-type nonlinear response; however, with the addition of mechanical stoppers the energy harvester displayed a strong hardening-type nonlinear response which is ideal for capturing kinetic energy over larger bandwidths. The addition of mechanical stoppers on a parametrically excited cantilever beam has significant qualitative and quantitative effects on the nonlinear parametric energy harvesting; the energy harvesting bandwidth was increased in the range of 35–145% by adjusting the stoppers.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic representation of the fabricated MBEH: (a) top view with a two stopper configuration and (b) electrical circuit

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Fig. 2

Photographs of the experimental setup: (a) photograph of the experiment setup, (b) top view photograph of a dual stopper configuration, and (c) top view photograph of a one stopper configuration

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Fig. 3

Comparison between fabricated MBEH with no stoppers or dual stoppers: (a) dimensioned frequency–voltage curve, (b) dimensioned frequency–current curve, and (c) nondimensional frequency–response curve with A = 9 m/s2

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Fig. 4

Effect of the gap distances (y1 and y2) for the system with dual stoppers: (a) dimensioned frequency–voltage curve, (b) dimensioned frequency–current curve, and (c) nondimensional frequency–response curve with A = 9 m/s2

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Fig. 5

Effect of the dual stoppers at various positions along the beam (x1 and x2): (a) dimensioned frequency–voltage curve, (b) dimensioned frequency–current curve, and (c) nondimensional frequency–response curve with A = 9 m/s2

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Fig. 6

(a) Time trace, (b) phase–plane diagram, and (c) PDF; of the system in Fig. 5 at 23.03 Hz (/ω1 = 2.7)

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Fig. 7

Effect of the one or dual stoppers with constant axial position (x) and gap distance between the beam (y): (a) dimensioned frequency–voltage curve, (b) dimensioned frequency–current curve, and (c) nondimensional frequency–response curve with A = 9 m/s2

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Fig. 8

Nonlinear parametric response of the MBEH without stoppers at various parametric excitations (A): (a) dimensioned frequency–voltage curve, (b) dimensioned frequency–current curve, and (c) nondimensional frequency–response curve

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Fig. 9

comsol simulations for the MBEH: (a) first-mode shape (ω1) and (b) comparison of theoretical and experimental data at the fundamental resonance with A = 3 m/s2

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