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Research Papers: Fuel Combustion

Novel Catalytic Systems for Waste Tires Pyrolysis: Optimization of Gas Fraction

[+] Author and Article Information
Sana Kordoghli

Ecole des Mines de Nantes,
GEPEA UMR 6144,
rue Alfred Kastler,
Nantes 44307, France;
Ecole Nationale d'Ingénieurs de Monastir,
Avenue Ibn EL Jazzar,
Monastir 5019, Tunisia
e-mail: kordoghli.sana@gmail.com

Maria Paraschiv

National Institute of R&D for Biological Sciences,
296 Splaiul Independentei,
Bucharest 060031, Romania;
Research Center for Advanced Materials,
Products and Processes (CAMPUS),
University Politehnica of Bucharest,
313 Splaiul Independentei,
Bucharest 060042, Romania
e-mail: maria.paraschiv@incdsb.ro

Mohand Tazerout

Ecole des Mines de Nantes,
GEPEA UMR 6144,
rue Alfred Kastler,
Nantes 44307, France
e-mail: mohand.tazerout@mines-nantes.fr

Besma Khiari

Institut Supérieur des Sciences et Technologies
de l'Environnement de Borj Cédria,
Hammam Lif 2050, Tunisia
e-mail: besmakhiari@yahoo.com

Fethi Zagrouba

Institut Supérieur des Sciences et Technologies
de l'Environnement de Borj Cédria,
Hammam Lif 2050, Tunisia
e-mail: fethi.zagrouba@isste.rnu.tn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Advanced Energy Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received February 13, 2016; final manuscript received October 10, 2016; published online November 16, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Yiannis Levendis.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 139(3), 032203 (Nov 16, 2016) (10 pages) Paper No: JERT-16-1090; doi: 10.1115/1.4034979 History: Received February 13, 2016; Revised October 10, 2016

In this paper, catalyzed pyrolysis of scrap tires was studied in order to identify the influence of catalysts on gas composition during the main thermal range of the decomposition process. The aim is related to gas fraction optimization in terms of yield, composition, and distribution during the pyrolysis process. This is an original work using for the first time powder catalysts (MgO, Al2O3, CaCO3, and zeolite ZSM-5) uniformly distributed on a single layer of oyster shells (OSs) particles. The catalyst/tires mass ratio was kept for all the tests at 1/30. Depending on used catalyst, pyrolysis products yields ranged from 39 to 42 wt.% for char, from 26 to 38 wt.% for oils, and from 16 to 30 wt.% for gas. Compared to the thermal pyrolysis, it was found that the liquid yield increases in the presence of MgO/OS, while the use of Al2O3/OS decreases it significantly. The gas yield grows in the presence of Al2O3/OS ranging from 24.6 wt.% (thermal pyrolysis) to 30.6 wt.%. On the other hand, ZSM-5/OS and CaCO3/OS did not bring significant changes in products yield, but there are considerable influences on the evolution of gas composition during the tires decomposition. Also, two important advantages of using these new catalytic systems are identified. These relate to the formation of gaseous species throughout the waste decomposition, thus harmonizing the calorific value for the entire thermal range, and the disappearance of heavy molecules in liquid fractions, simplifying or canceling further upgrading processes.

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Topics: Catalysts , Pyrolysis , Tires
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Oyster shell (OS) particles used as support for catalyst powder

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Fig. 2

Experimental setup

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Fig. 3

The yield pyrolysis products obtained in thermal and catalyzed pyrolysis

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Fig. 4

The HHV of solid and liquid products

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Fig. 5

The evolution of H2 in the pyrolysis gas during the process

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Fig. 6

The evolution of CH4 in the pyrolysis gas during the process

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Fig. 7

The evolution of C2H6 in the pyrolysis gas during the process

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Fig. 8

The evolution of C2H4 in the pyrolysis gas during the process

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Fig. 9

The evolution of C3H8 in the pyrolysis gas during the process

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Fig. 10

The evolution of C3H6 in the pyrolysis gas during the process

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Fig. 11

The evolution of C4H10 in the pyrolysis gas during the process

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Fig. 12

The evolution of CO in the pyrolysis gas during the process

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Fig. 13

The evolution of H2S in the pyrolysis gas during the process

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Fig. 14

LHV of gas produced by one-stage catalyzed pyrolysis

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