0
Research Papers: Energy Systems Analysis

Hydrogen Production by Carbon-Catalyzed Methane Decomposition Via Thermogravimetry

[+] Author and Article Information
Vidyasagar Shilapuram

Chemical Engineering Department,
National Institute of Technology, Warangal,
Warangal, Telangana 506004, India
e-mail: vidyasagars@nitw.ac.in

Nesrin Ozalp

Department of Mechanical and
Industrial Engineering,
University of Minnesota Duluth,
Duluth, MN 55812
e-mail: nozalp@d.umn.edu

Contributed by the Advanced Energy Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received September 19, 2015; final manuscript received October 25, 2016; published online November 29, 2016. Editor: Hameed Metghalchi.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 139(1), 012005 (Nov 29, 2016) (8 pages) Paper No: JERT-15-1353; doi: 10.1115/1.4035145 History: Received September 19, 2015; Revised October 25, 2016

Hydrogen is a high energy content fuel and methane is currently the most preferred feedstock for hydrogen production. Direct thermal splitting of methane offers the cleanest technique to produce hydrogen and carbon as coproduct fuel. Carbonaceous catalysts have significant impact on methane to hydrogen conversion. This study presents thermogravimetric experiment results of carbon-catalyzed methane decomposition using commercial catalyst. Results are presented in terms of carbon formation rate, amount of carbon deposition on the catalyst, sustainability factor, catalyst activity, and kinetics of the reaction. The results show that weight gain because of carbon formation depends on reaction temperature, methane volume percent in the feed gas, and nature of the carbonaceous catalyst. It was observed that the reaction rate was dominant at the beginning, and deactivation rate was dominant toward the end of reaction. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis of deactivated catalytic samples show decreasing disorder with increasing reaction temperature. Finally, performance comparison of activated carbons (ACs) studied in literature shows that activated carbon sample chosen in this study outperforms in terms of carbon deposition, reaction rate, carbon weight gain, and sustainability factor.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Ozalp, N. , 2009, “ Energy Process-Step Model of Hydrogen Production in the U.S. Chemical Industry,” ASME J. Energy Resour. Technol., 131(2), p. 022601. [CrossRef]
Mokheimer, E. M. A. , Hussain, M. I. , Ahmed, S. , Habob, M. A. , and Al-Qutub, A. A. , 2014, “ On the Modelling of Steam Methane Reforming,” ASME J. Energy Resour. Technol., 137(1), p. 012001. [CrossRef]
Berry, G. D. , and Aceves, S. M. , 2005, “ The Case for Hydrogen in a Carbon Constrained World,” ASME J. Energy Resour. Technol., 127(2), pp. 89–94. [CrossRef]
Vellini, M. , and Tonziello, J. , 2010, “ Hydrogen Use in an Urban District: Energy and Environmental Comparisons,” ASME J. Energy Resour. Technol., 132(4), p. 042601. [CrossRef]
Ozalp, N. , Kogan, A. , and Epstein, M. , 2009, “ Solar Decomposition of Fossil Fuels as an Option for Sustainability,” Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, 34(2), pp. 710–720. [CrossRef]
Bshish, A. , Yaakob, Z. , Ebshish, A. , and Alhasan, F. H. , 2013, “ Hydrogen Production Via Ethanol Steam Reforming Over Ni/Al2O3 Catalysts: Effect of Ni Loading,” ASME J. Energy Resour. Technol., 136(1), p. 012601. [CrossRef]
Gradisher, L. , Dutcher, B. , and Fan, M. , 2015, “ Catalytic Hydrogen Production From Fossil Fuels Via the Water Gas Shift Reaction,” Appl. Energy, 139, pp. 335–349. [CrossRef]
Li, X. , Zhu, G. , Qi, S. , Huang, J. , and Yang, B. , 2014, “ Simultaneous Production of Hythane and Carbon Nanotubes Via Catalytic Decomposition of Methane With Catalysts Dispersed on Porous Supports,” Appl. Energy, 130, pp. 846–852. [CrossRef]
Torres, D. , Pinilla, J. L. , Lázaro, M. J. , Moliner, R. , and Suelves, I. , 2014, “ Hydrogen and Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes Production by Catalytic Decomposition of Methane: Thermogravimetric Analysis and Scaling-Up of Fe–Mo Catalysts,” Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, 39(8), pp. 3698–3709. [CrossRef]
Abanades, S. , Kimurab, H. , and Otsuka, H. , 2014, “ Hydrogen Production From Thermo-Catalytic Decomposition of Methane Using Carbon Black Catalysts in an Indirectly-Irradiated Tubular Packed-Bed Solar Reactor,” Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, 39(33), pp. 18770–18783. [CrossRef]
Pinilla, J. L. , Suelves, I. , Lazaro, M. J. , and Molieiner, R. , 2008, “ Kinetic Study of the Thermal Decomposition of Methane Using Carboneous Catalysts,” Chem. Eng. J., 138, pp. 301–306. [CrossRef]
Suelves, I. , Pinilla, J. L. , Lázaro, M. J. , and Moliner, R. , 2008, “ Carbonaceous Materials as Catalysts for Decomposition of Methane,” Chem. Eng. J., 140, pp. 432–438. [CrossRef]
Serrano, D. P. , Botas, J. A. , and Guil-Lopez, R. , 2009, “ H2 Production From Methane Pyrolysis Over Commercial Carbon Catalysts: Kinetic and Deactivation Study,” Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, 34(10), pp. 4488–4494. [CrossRef]
Serrano, D. P. , Botas, J. A. , Fierro, J. L. G. , Guil-Lopez, R. , Pizarro, P. , and Gomez, G. , 2010, “ Hydrogen Production by Methane Decomposition: Origin of the Catalytic Activity of Carbon Materials,” Fuel, 89(6), pp. 1241–1248. [CrossRef]
Abbas, H. F. , and Daud, W. M. A. W. , 2009, “ Thermocatalytic Decomposition of Methane Using Palm Shell Based Activated Carbon: Kinetic and Deactivation Studies,” Fuel Process. Technol., 90(9), pp. 1167–1174. [CrossRef]
Shilapuram, V. , Ozalp, N. , Oschatz, M. , Borchardt, L. , and Kaskel, S. , 2014, “ Hydrogen Production From Catalytic Decomposition of Methane Over Ordered Mesoporous Carbons (CMK-3) and Carbide-Derived Carbon (DUT-19),” Carbon, 67, pp. 377–389. [CrossRef]
Shilapuram, V. , Ozalp, N. , Oschatz, M. , Borchardt, L. , and Kaskel, S. , 2014, “ Thermogravimetric Analysis of Activated Carbons, Ordered Mesoporous Carbide-Derived Carbons, and Their Deactivation Kinetics of Catalytic Methane Decomposition,” Ind. Eng. Chem. Res., 53(5), pp. 1741–1753. [CrossRef]
Ozalp, N. , and Shilapuram, V. , 2011, “ Characterization of Activated Carbon for Carbon Laden Flows in a Solar Reactor,” ASME Paper No. AJTEC2011-44381.
Moliner, R. , Suelves, I. , Lázaro, M. J. , and Moreno, O. , 2005, “ Thermocatalytic Decomposition of Methane Over Activated Carbons: Influence of Textural Properties and Surface Chemistry,” Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, 30(3), pp. 293–300. [CrossRef]
Suelves, I. , Lázaro, M. J. , Moliner, R. , Pinilla, J. L. , and Cubero, H. , 2007, “ Hydrogen Production by Methane Decarbonization: Carbonaceous Catalysts,” Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, 32(15), pp. 3320–3326. [CrossRef]
Ashok, J. , Naveen Kumar, S. , Venugopal, A. , Durga Kumari, V. , Tripathi, S. , and Subrahmanyam, M. , 2008, “ COx Free Hydrogen by Methane Decomposition Over Activated Carbons,” Catal. Commun., 9(1), pp. 164–169. [CrossRef]
Kim, M. H. , Lee, E. K. , Jun, J. H. , Kong, S. J. , Han, G. Y. , Lee, B. K. , Lee, T. J. , and Yoon, K. J. , 2004, “ Hydrogen Production by Catalytic Decomposition of Methane Over Activated Carbons: Kinetic Study,” Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, 29(2), pp. 187–193. [CrossRef]
Bai, Z. , Chen, H. , Li, B. , and Li, W. , 2005, “ Catalytic Decomposition of Methane Over Activated Carbon,” J. Anal. Appl. Pyrolysis, 73(2), pp. 335–341. [CrossRef]
Muradov, N. , Smith, F. , and T-Raissi, A. , 2005, “ Catalytic Activity of Carbons for Methane Decomposition,” Catal. Today, 102–103, pp. 225–233. [CrossRef]
Chen, W. H. , and Lin, B. J. , 2013, “ Hydrogen and Synthesis Gas Production From Activated Carbon and Steam Via Reusing Carbon Dioxide,” Appl. Energy, 101, pp. 551–559. [CrossRef]
Serrano, D. P. , Botas, J. A. , Fierro, J. L. G. , Guil-Lopez, R. , Pizarro, P. , and Gomez, G. , 2010, “ Hydrogen Production by Methane Decomposition: Origin of the Catalytic Activity of Carbon Materials,” Fuel, 89(6), pp. 1241–1248. [CrossRef]
Botas, J. A. , Serrano, D. P. , Guil-Lopez, R. , Pizarro, P. , and Gomez, G. , 2010, “ Methane Catalytic Decomposition Over Ordered Mesoporous Carbons: A Promising Route for Hydrogen Production,” Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, 35(18), pp. 9788–9794. [CrossRef]
Serrano, D. P. , Botas, J. A. , Pizarro, P. , Guil-Lopez, R. , and Gomez, G. , 2008, “ Ordered Mesoporous Carbons as Highly Active Catalysts for Hydrogen Production by CH4 Decomposition,” Chem. Commun., 48, pp. 6585–6587. [CrossRef]
Abbas, H. F. , and Daud, W. M. A. W. , 2009, “ Deactivation of Palm Shell-Based Activated Carbon Catalyst Used for Hydrogen Production by Thermocatalytic Decomposition of Methane,” Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, 34(15), pp. 6231–6241. [CrossRef]
Chen, J. , Yang, Z. , and Li, Y. , 2010, “ Investigation on the Structure and the Oxidation Activity of the Solid Carbon Produced From Catalytic Decomposition of Methane,” Fuel, 89(5), pp. 943–948. [CrossRef]

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Evolution of carbon deposition by change in temperature

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Evolution of carbon deposition by change in methane volume percent

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Initial rate of reaction versus temperature at different methane volume percent

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Sustainability factor as a function of methane volume percent at different temperatures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Carbon deposition on catalyst as a function of methane volume percent at various temperatures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Total amount of carbon production per gram of catalyst as a function of methane volume percent at various temperatures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Carbon formation rate at different methane volume percent

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Carbon formation rate at different temperatures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Carbon formation rate (rC) versus carbon deposition (Cdep/CCatalyst)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Initial reaction rate versus partial pressure of methane at various temperatures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Arrhenius plot of ln(kP) as a function of 1/T

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Catalyst activity versus time for different methane volume percent

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

X-ray diffraction pattern of fresh Fluka 05105 and after decomposition at 800 °C, 850 °C, 900 °C, and 950 °C

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

SEM image of the deactivated catalyst after decomposition at 950 °C

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In