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Research Papers: Petroleum Engineering

Quantification of a Single Gas Bubble Growth in Solvent(s)–CO2–Heavy Oil Systems With Consideration of Multicomponent Diffusion Under Nonequilibrium Conditions

[+] Author and Article Information
Yu Shi

Petroleum Systems Engineering,
Faculty of Engineering and
Applied Science,
University of Regina,
Regina, SK S4S 0A2, Canada

Daoyong Yang

Petroleum Systems Engineering,
Faculty of Engineering and
Applied Science,
University of Regina,
Regina, SK S4S 0A2, Canada
e-mail: tony.yang@uregina.ca

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Petroleum Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received August 30, 2016; final manuscript received October 27, 2016; published online November 29, 2016. Editor: Hameed Metghalchi.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 139(2), 022908 (Nov 29, 2016) (11 pages) Paper No: JERT-16-1353; doi: 10.1115/1.4035150 History: Received August 30, 2016; Revised October 27, 2016

A mechanistic model has been developed and validated to quantify a single gas bubble growth with considering multicomponent gas diffusion in solvent(s)–CO2–heavy oil systems under nonequilibrium conditions. Experimentally, constant-composition expansion (CCE) experiments are conducted for C3H8–CO2–heavy oil systems under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions, respectively. Theoretically, the classic continuity equation, motion equation, diffusion–convection equation, real gas equation, and Peng–Robinson equation of state (PR EOS) are integrated into an equation matrix to dynamically predict gas bubble growth. Also, the viscous term of motion equation on the gas phase pressure is included due mainly to the viscous nature of heavy oil. The newly proposed model has been validated by using the experimentally measured gas bubble radius as a function of time with good accuracy. Combining with the experimental measurements, the critical nucleus radius and gas bubble growth are quantitatively predicted with the newly proposed model. Effects of mass transfer, supersaturation pressure, mole concentration of each component, liquid cell radius, and pressure decline rate on the gas bubble growth are examined and analyzed. In general, gas bubble growth rate is found to increase with an increase of each of the aforementioned five parameters though the contribution of individual component in a gas mixture to the bubble growth rate is different. A one-step pressure drop and the unlimited liquid volume surrounding a gas bubble are considered to be the necessary conditions to generate the linear relationship between gas bubble radius and the square root of time.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

The schematic of cell model

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Fig. 2

Flowchart of numerically solving the equation matrix

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Fig. 3

Comparison of the measured and calculated bubble radius for n-C5H12n-C14H30 systems

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Fig. 9

The relationship between the bubble radius and time with different liquid cell radius

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Fig. 8

The relationship between the bubble radius and time with varying (a) both two gases mole fractions, (b) CO2 mole fraction, and (c) C3H8 mole fraction

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Fig. 7

The relationship between the bubble radius and time with different supersaturation pressures

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Fig. 6

The relationship between the bubble radius and time with varying individual diffusion coefficient of (a) CO2, (b) C3H8 with the 100% original mole fraction of both gases, and (c) CO2 and C3H8 with 50% C3H8 original mole fraction

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Fig. 5

Bubble radius as a function of time with varying two gas diffusion coefficients

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Fig. 4

The calculated radius of a gas bubble for C3H8–CO2–heavy oil systems

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Fig. 10

The relationship between the bubble radius and time with different pressure decline rates

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Fig. 11

The relationship between the bubble radius and square root of time

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